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Bridge or DSLR

Discussion in 'General Equipment Chat & Advice' started by David Dumble, Jun 4, 2021.

  1. David Dumble

    David Dumble Member

    Hi
    Im looking at buying ether a Nikon D350 with 2 lenses up to 300mm
    The other camera was a bridgecamera
    A lumix Fz2000
    I am strictly amateur with a limited budget I want a half decent camera than can give me multiple shot options
    I would like to enlarge some of my pics to hang on the wall i want to know what my best option is in your opinion
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Hi David,
    The single most important thing about a camera is whether you like using it and the only way to tell that is to spend some time in a camera shop holding it. Bridge cameras with 1” sensors are surprisingly good. I can tell the difference between pics my wife takes with a Sony RX 10 mk iii and I do with Canon gear costing many times more but it is not a large difference. Personally I like phaffing about choosing lenses etc.she can’t be bothered with that, just wants one thing to pick up and use.
     
  3. David Dumble

    David Dumble Member

    Thank you I had a old canon a eos D250 i think and its was ok for what I needed im guessing that now the majority of cameras will be of much better quality than back then
    Think i will probably opt for the bridge option for sheer convienience i think
    Cheers for taking the time to reply thanks
     
    Done_rundleCams likes this.
  4. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    There have been a lot of changes to both DSLRs and “mirrorless” of which compact/bridge cameras are a subset. Older compact/bridge cameras and mirrorless took an age to focus which ruled them out for some applications. This is, for top-of-range, no longer true but the only way to see if something suits is to try it.
     
    David Dumble likes this.
  5. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    I have a DSLR with a 16 megapixel APC-C sensor.

    This is larger than a 'micro four thirds' or 'one inch' sensor, and a bit less than half the size of a a 'full frame' sensor - if all this is new to you, look here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image_sensor_format

    I have found this to capable of producing images than can be printed to 50 x 75 cm when a decent lens has been used, so it is an example of what might suit you. However, before buying anything you need to decide what you are prepared to carry, and what size camera body 'fits your hands'. Also, there is a lot of decent stuff available second hand from the reputable dealers who advertise in AP because many people are seduced by the perceived need to regularly upgrade to the latest model.

    A camera like the Nikon D3500 sound like a good place to start looking. Since it has interchangeable lenses (you will find lots of these available second hand too, especially in Canon and Nikon DSLR mounts), it offers more long-term flexibility than a bridge camera with its fixed lens. And if you do invest in some decent second hand lenses, you can keep them if you want to buy a more modern camera body later.

    I would suggest that if you plan to look for second hand lenses (most of mine are second hand), choosing the right camera body will give you more choice. You will find many more second hand lenses to fit a Canon or Nikon DSLR body than you will for a more recent 'mirrorless' camera body, for example - and at probably at better prices too.
     
  6. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    You can print anything to any size you want. I've seen very nice 4 and 5 foot wide prints made from 6MP cameras.

    The main thing is whether the camera does what the user wants and you can only know that by using the camera to take the pictures you're after. My advice is to start by finding the cheapest digital camera you can. Take the thing out and use it. It might not achieve what you want but you'll know what its limits are and you may be very surprised to discover what you can achieve with a bargain camera. For example, I bought this unloved Fuji for £5 from a local charity shop and I was quite pleased with the pictures it could give...

    Fuji SL300 camera E-PL5 P6160002.JPG
    Teenagers at waters edge Sidmouth sea front SL300 DSCF3529.jpg
    Crow walking on metal fence white background SL300 DSCF3460.JPG
    Bus driver smiling at colleague SL300 DSCF3452.jpg
    New Street Exmouth SL300 DSCF3751.JPG
     
  7. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Depends whether you want to change lenses or not. A 24-400 or 24-600 mm (equivalent) bridge camera is a lot more “flexible” on a day out than a bag full of kit.
     
  8. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    The first lens I purchased when 'going digital' was a Tamron 18-250 bundled with the recently-discontinued Pentax K-10 body at a good price (it's also the last lens I purchased new). It still gets regular use, but its main weakness is the image quality at the long end of the zoom. Below 150 mm it will produce images that can be printed to 30 x 45 or perhaps 40 x 60 cm, but as you approach 250 mm a decent print at 20 x 30 cm is about it. If this matches your needs, then I don't hesitate to recommend the lens. However, I have found the images from an old model Sigma 17-70 to be better and this is now my most-used lens, followed by my old-model Sigma 10-20.

    Of course, what I call a decent print is a matter of opinion. I mean when viewed from a sensible viewing distance, not examined close-up with a magnifying glass.
     
  9. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I agree it is down to personal judgement. I don’t turn my nose up at the results my wife gets with her Sony RX10 iii @ 600mm. They are not what I can get with a Canon 1Div and 500 F4 ( 650 mm equivalent) but the RX 10 is a hell of a lot easier to carry and you’d have to print big and look close to see the difference.
     
  10. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Bridge or DSLR is already a limiting question, in your position I would also consider mirrorless. I don’t particularly like EVFs but a bridge camera has one so I assume that isn’t a problem.

    My other concern is that you previously owned a Canon EOS 250D, did you find something about it that you disliked? If not, another Canon would seem a logical choice. Nikon do things differently from Canon, are you sure you can “cope” with the differences?
     
  11. David Dumble

    David Dumble Member

    I am open to another canon to i have a number of canon fit lenses not sure what fit so unless a bridge camera set everything apart utilising my old lenses might be a great option
    Thanks for your reply
     
  12. David Dumble

    David Dumble Member

    Thanks to all of you who have replied you have pointed out many many things and it has helped enormously
    I feel i now know what im looking at
    I think at this moment i may stick at canon dslr and utilise my existing lenzes
    Now picking a model in my budget
    Thank you all much appreciated
     
  13. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Indeed.

    As I pointed out above, "quality" is entirely in the eye of the beholder. One person's "not so good" photograph is another person's "wow"!

    We really shouldn't be pushing the myths about sharpness and such like to newcomers, it only encourages them to spend money that they may not be able to afford and from which they may not receive the claimed benefit. There's so much cheap kit out there and for many it will be just what they need. For others it could be the stepping stone to more sophisticated kit, once they understand the limits of what they have against what they want to achieve.
     
  14. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    Perhaps pause before replacing your old Canon D250 DSLR, and spend some time using it. Then, if your still want to buy something more modern you should have a clearer idea of what features you need and want to pay for. Not that a D250 is old by my standards - it has a 24 megapixel APC-C sensor and is more modern than the DSLR that I am quite happy with. I would keep it and look for decent second hand lenses to use with it.
     
  15. David Dumble

    David Dumble Member

    I was talking rubbish it was an old EOS 400d I have i think im gona opt for a Canon M50 and but an adapter to use my old lenses
    The advice on here has been first class just honest opinions and no bull or judgement on myself
    That is rare these day thank you once im set up and have taken some pucs i will let you see how im getting on
     
  16. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    The 400D should be capable of taking decent pictures - its 10 magapixel sensor should produce images than can be printed to at least 30 x 45 cm. My first DSLR was also a 10 Mp model, and above my PC monitor I have a framed 50 x 75 cm print from a shot taken with it. But (and this is important) I was using a decent lens - my old model Sigma 10-20 at F11.

    Will an M50, plus one of your old DSLR lenses and a lens adapter be any smaller than the 400D plus the same lens?
    Whatever you choose to buy, consider uploading some of your best shots (resized to 800-1000 pixels on the loner side) to the Gallery on this website.
     
  17. Snorri

    Snorri Well-Known Member

    Nothing wrong with the 400D if it works. Throwing the eos 200D into the mix as it is not much bigger than the mirror less Canons, and would take all the old 400D lenses and accessories without any adapters.
     
  18. David Dumble

    David Dumble Member

    The size is not an issue for me tbh i eill go to a local shop and see the model in person and make a call from there
    I initially didnt think i could utilize my old lenses now I know you can i might as well make use of them
    Thanks again for your input
     
  19. alfbranch

    alfbranch Well-Known Member

    I
    It still has the no longer necessary mirror.

    I am a more than happy stick with my mirrorless Olympus m4/3 camera myself. After 7 years without a flappy mirror I do not miss it.

    What are you looking to shoot and what is your budget?
    The supposed advantages of a DSLR are often absent from budget models. Like bright viewfinders and good AF. Not all models are equal.
     
  20. alfbranch

    alfbranch Well-Known Member

    That is a good way to go try what you have and get better with that.
     

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