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Apparently there is something coming in the new year plus a few months.

Discussion in 'Nikon Chat' started by Learning, Oct 28, 2021.

  1. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    When the D800 became available I bought one. For the time its performance was a miracle. I never really got on with it. The real success of the D8xx line is the D850.
    Presently I use D500. I like the ergonomics of the D500; they are similar to those of the D850 and D5.

    As for Geoff's list I agree with all those points but would add that the Z9 seems to have the same control layout as the D5, D850 and D500 with the exception of missing buttons alongside the left hand side of the screen. I would guess that the functionality of the function buttons to be similar. I would also add to the list the return of 3D tracking. I expect that this will be accessed just as it is in premium DSLR cameras. I briefly inspected the Z7ii. The access to the AF modes was not to my liking.
    Mostly I use a 16-80 lens on the D500 or 24-120 on the D800. I can control playback functions of the camera with two hands and press the left hand buttons with left thumb. That's good.
    Sometimes I use a 200-500 lens. In that case I want to support the weight of the lens with my left hand even when not making exposures. In that case the left hand buttons are not convenient.
    Removing the row of left hand buttons on the Z9 may be a help for users of heavy lenses just as much as to allow the screen to be swung sideways.
     
  2. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Using burst will always yield more shots per charge than 'normal' use.
     
  3. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    3D tracking never went away, I have it on my D4. If it was deleted in the D5 I would be surprised.
    Said buttons have just moved to the right below the multi-selector. On the D4, all the buttons on the left of the monitor relate to information on the display and have no use when the camera is to the eye.
     
  4. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Having already determined that financially switching to mirrorless is a non starter I did some other calculations. Mirrorless technology is lighter than SLR technology right?
    Based on the Z9 body because I don't like small bodies and the Z6 II/Z7 II grip is abominable.
    Two Z9 bodies, a 24-70 f2.8 and a 70-200 f2.8 and a 1.7x teleconverter the weight difference is around 75g, in favour of the SLRs.

    It seems that, for me, there is no advantage in terms of weight, battery life (convenience) or performance in switching. I don't need 45MP resolution, or the new MacBook Pro with a 2TB hard drive to support it. Yes eye recognition focusing would be nice but I seem to have managed with out it for nearly 50 years. I'll review the position in five years when the Z9 III or IV is released.
     
  5. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    Yes, but 23,000 shots on one charge and with 30% capacity still being shown?? That's seriously impressive, even if it were from a "traditional" DSLR never mind mirrorless.
     
  6. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Is it though? Only about 15 minutes of video at 25fps to get that many frames.
     
  7. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    The only, minor, problem with quoted battery life is that the testing method will bear little or no resemblance to you own actual use case. Only once you have "calibrated" your brain to convert the "official" figures to your own use case can you determine how good, or bad, is the battery life.
     
    Zou likes this.
  8. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    Does the manufacturer's guarantee have any small print about the number of shutter activations?
    At this rate I cannot see it lasting a year.
     
  9. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    What shutter?
     
    DaveM399 likes this.
  10. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    An interview at Dpreview with Naoyuki Murakami Executive Fellow and Sector Manager of the Development Sector, in Nikon's Imaging Business Unit. doesn't have much new content but confirms what we already know. DX is regarded as entry level. 3D tracking is only for top models.
    I see little chance of mirrorless equivalent of D500. Even a mirrorless equivalent of the D850 I would think is in doubt.
    We now know what Sony and Nikon consider a top camera. Just the Canon R1 to come.
     
  11. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    I've just found the 'first look' article about the Nikon Z9 in the latest AP, seen the price and jumped straight to the conclusion at the end where it explains 'Nikon's decision to eliminate the mechanical shutter entirely', noting that 'entirely' must be redundant since it's either eliminated or it's not.

    This must be the Holy Grail of modern camera body design. Without these mechanical parts to wear out or fail, how many decades of careful use should the body provide? It will be interesting to see if this technology ever 'trickles down' to affordable camera bodies, or if it is limited to the top of the range models.
     
  12. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    I would think that the "technology" behind the elimination of a mechanical shutter is down to the sensor and the software/electronics that read the information on the sensor.
    I wonder how much cheaper it is to eliminate a mechanical shutter assembly and replace it with a different sensor and electronic components? Or is it more expensive at the moment and will economies of scale result in the costs lowering significantly in the future? Will higher pricing of "shutterless" cameras be a marketing/profit exercise rather than a reflection of actual costs?
     
  13. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Again I have to question your conclusions. The D850 and Z7 II are very similar in specification, sure the D850 has a larger buffer and better battery life but I would call them broadly equivalent.

    DX is another matter, with the F mount there was no real disadvantage to having DX and FX using the same lens mount but with the Z mount there is, DX lenses don't need a lens throat anything like that large so you end up with an oversized lens mount and lenses to match. It is quite clear that Canon's decision to have two system of mirrorless camera is sensible and effective. I doubt Nikon will go the same way but we shall see.
     
  14. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    The IBIS is still mechanical.
    The efficient powerful processors should trickle down. Stacked sensors are presumably expensive to produce and may trickle down slowly; that might be an obstacle to quick release of Z8.
    On Geoff's argument that the D850 and Z7 ll have similar specification I would say only in numbers. The control layout and use of the function buttons are very different.
    If you look at the D2, D200, D3, D300, D4, D800, D5, D500, D850, D6 and now the Z9 you see an evolutionary refinement of Nikon's professional and enthusiast ergonomics and user interface.
    The technology in the Z5, Z6 ll and Z 7 ll is brilliant at their respective price points. The technology is let down by how it is controlled by the user.
    I admit that I have only briefly examined the Z7 and Z7 ll - examined them only long enough to know that I did not like them.
    Of the D cameras, I have owned the D200, D300, D800. and D500.
     
  15. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    So a body without this would be cheaper and simpler to make? I could live without it if it made the body less expensive, but suspect that the policy of 'include everything' will continue with regular 'upgrades' so that many customers will want to replace a mint condition body with a new one. Much as happens now, which is why the second hand market is so well stocked.
     
  16. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

     
  17. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    That depends on the availability of batteries and spare parts, the use of lead free solder does not apparently help longevity of soldered components, let alone the weakening of sensors and displays with age.
     
  18. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    The second hand market is in a way recycling or more accurately allowing continued use, it allows those of us who don't have to have the latest and "best" whenever there is an upgrade to buy at a more affordable figure, especially when we sell on an item when be buy a used piece of kit. The level of frothing about the Z9 on Facebook is high, it's not something that happens much on here, we're too sensible:D.
     
  19. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Who are you and what have you done with Nimbus?
     
  20. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    I'm fine, the aliens treated me very well.
     

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