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Any ways to stop shadows?

Discussion in 'General Equipment Chat & Advice' started by Alanah Davies-Brown, Sep 7, 2017.

  1. Alanah Davies-Brown

    Alanah Davies-Brown New Member

    Hello,
    I am currently a photographer for an ecommerce company and wondered if anyone would be able to help with my problem.
    Unfortunately we are only renting the lighting equipment on the day of the shoots so I do not have any time to play around with it and we are getting large shadows on each image which I am then editing out on photoshop afterwards but now I am being told they are taking too long to edit. The lights we are using are a profoto D1(which is usually set to 9.0), a bowens Gemini 500pro (set to 6.0), and a bowens Gemini 500 (set to 6.0). The studio is very very small the current set up we are using is profoto on the front right of the model, bowens 500 pro on the front left of the model (both with softboxes) and the bowens 500 on the left side behind the model in some attempt to back light (this is without any softbox etc. As there is not room. The model themselves is lit well it is just the shadows that are the issue. If anyone has any advice on any other set ups to try I would be extremely greatful!
     
  2. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    Somewhat difficult to know what to suggest without an image to look at. If you post two...one of the image you get before you edit and one edited one to show what you're trying to achieve only without so much time spent editing, we might be better able to help.
     
  3. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    As Garen says it is difficult to help without some more information but at first sight I would suggest some form of reflector. I have a small collapsible one that came attached to a copy of AP some years ago but at a push a white sheet and a helpful assistant can work wonders
     
  4. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Bigger soft boxes, closer in, better balanced? More room behind the model?

    If the studio is too small, it's too small, and there's not much you can do except find a bigger studio.

    As others say, without knowing what you're shooting and what you want, it's hard to give much help.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  5. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    sounds like too much light aimed at whatever your subject is.
     
  6. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Pete,

    Not really possible. Shadows are thrown by any light, regardless of intensity: you can always stop down or open up. As I said, it's a question of balance. Or of the background being too close.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  7. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    All lights throw shadows.
    By positioning the lights, subject and camera you can choose where the shadows fall in the image.
    You can soften the lights to create softer shadows.
    You can light the background separately to kill the shadows.
    You can use shadows creatively.

    Without directional light you have no modeling, shape or texture.

    The control of light and shade (lighting) is the skill set of a professional photographer.
     
  8. PhotoEcosse

    PhotoEcosse Well-Known Member

    Precisely.
     
  9. AndyTake2

    AndyTake2 Well-Known Member

    shadows behind model can be killed with a light aimed at the background (assuming the background is not key to the shot)
     
  10. Alanah Davies-Brown

    Alanah Davies-Brown New Member

    Hi guys, yes as previously stated the studio is very small I already have one light on the backdrop but there is not room for another and the model is unable to stand further forward unfortunately. Hopefully within the next few weeks we will be moving to a bigger premises where hopefully there will be enough room to sort this issue out but for now I am looking for any advice available. This is a quick before and after image, we do not mind slight shadowing around feet etc.
    Thank you all for your time and advice.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. AndyTake2

    AndyTake2 Well-Known Member

  12. Alanah Davies-Brown

    Alanah Davies-Brown New Member

    This is the lighting we are aiming for, wjat do you think the set up for this would be? Thank you!
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Possibly two soft lights aimed at the background to kill any shadows then the model lit with a main light from the left and a fill from the right. You need enough space between the model and the backdrop for this to work properly but you say your studio is too cramped so you'll have a problem there. The workaround might be to cut the model out of the original frame and paste into an evenly lit background frame.
     
  14. Alanah Davies-Brown

    Alanah Davies-Brown New Member

    Thank you! Thankfully we will be moving to the new studio by the next shoot so I can try this set up. Thank you all for your advice!
     
  15. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    Look at where the shadows are falling in the 'aiming for' shot and compare them to where the shadows are falling in your shot. The model is still apparently quite close to the background but she has been lit from much higher. Also in your own shot it's quite clear that there's more light coming in from one side than the other. To get even lighting you need the power from both lamps to be the same, and the position and direction of each light to mirror the other.
     
  16. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    They have used a very large overhead soft box tilted slightly forward, providing the main light. However it is probable that both the background and the model have had additional lighting. Or her front would have been less well defined.
     
    Geren likes this.
  17. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member


    I don't think that would help in this situation - the model is standing in a cove and if you plonked that behind her you'd only be able to shoot her top half wihtout having to worry about where the light box meets the ground.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  18. Scphoto

    Scphoto Well-Known Member

    Maybe the e-commerce company should spend a little more time and money in such an important visual area then they wouldn't have these issues.

    Just to note as the photographer you really seem to have been dropped in it and I'm not having a go. Just seems they want the world, but only have the budget for a wet weekend in Rhyl.
     
  19. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Stephen,

    Nah... Everyone knows that all you need is an expensive camera. Knowing how to use it, or how to light the subject, is completely irrelevant. As it was before the advent of digital...

    Cheers,

    R.
     
    Scphoto likes this.

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