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Any non-Adobe options for tagging and cataloguing photos on iPad?

Discussion in 'Computer Related Help & Discussion' started by cerebros, Jun 25, 2020.

  1. cerebros

    cerebros Well-Known Member

    Hi everyone,

    Are there any iPad apps (other than presumably Lightroom) that do image keywording?

    As I'll be in the market for something to replace my laptop in the next few months I'm trying to keep my eyes open to all options, especially as I ideally want to get something I can comfortably use sat in the passenger seat of the car on the way back from holiday or if stood up on the train because I've not been able to get a seat (assuming the work situation ever goes back to "normal").

    Because of this I'm starting to look at 2 in 1 laptops as well as tablet options, which brings the iPad into play.

    From my research so far, it seems I should be able to do a lot of what I'd want to do on an iPad (I don't do heavy editing of my photos and only limited video editing) but if there's something that covers the tagging side of things, with the results being output as xmp files, I don't seem to have come across it.

    So, are there any apps that do this?
     
  2. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I presume the pictures will be hosted elsewhere so it’s more to do with the interface with the hosting service than any independent app.
     
  3. cerebros

    cerebros Well-Known Member

    Well how I'd expect to do things would typically be take photos, transfer that day's files to the iPad for tagging/star rating, (quick edit of anything being put in my Facebook album in Affinity), upload images and xmp files to NAS for storage (at the end of the day or when I'm done tagging and next have access to the NAS)
     
  4. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    The utility of tagging is that you can search by subject. Normally this involves a database that connects tags with the file location. You search the database, it returns the files via their locations. Some information can be stored in files, if I star rate a raw image in Canon DPP then that rating will persist if I open the image in Lightroom. Maybe you can add text tags to files explicitly but reading and using them is going to be very inefficient without an index (database)
     
  5. cerebros

    cerebros Well-Known Member

    Yes, the ultimate aim is to get the files ready to be imported into another package, on a computer, that can read the xmp files off the NAS and import them into its database for searching.
     
  6. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I’d suggest to find that solution first and work backwards. I believe ipads don’t have such thing as a file system. Apps have their own data-space which might look like a file system but isn’t. Some apps can exchange data with other apps which appears as an “open with” dialogue but it isn’t the same as reading a file off disk as you would on a computer OS.
     
  7. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Having done the obvious and Googled ".XMP" I learn that;
    XMP (Extensible Metadata Platform) files are saved in a standard plain text format that can be searched by XMP-compatible applications. The format was developed by Adobe as a means to standardize metadata across multiple file types, such as images, databases, and web documents. While XMP data is supported by several third-party applications, it is primarily used by Adobe software to store metadata for camera raw files.

    Thus the majority of photo editing software packages will generate .xmp files when an image is edited so I have to agree that the first task is to identify the application then determine which platform will support the application and offer sufficient storage. Personally, I wouldn't use an iPAd for this, not because it can't do the job but because the absence of an accessible* file system means that you can't see what it is doing.

    *What I mean is a file system that you can see and work with, even an iPad must have a system of storage otherwise it would be chaos.
     
  8. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    They are often called "sidecar" files. I think Capture One uses them (long time since I used a "lite" version), as can do OnOne software (its an option) as well as Adobe (option for LightRoom).
     
  9. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    With Nikon, I don't use any other make of camera, the meta data is contained within the NEF, simply meaning that the XMP can't be seen as a separate file (assuming such exists), until some form of editing is performed when a separate file is created, containing the edit parameters, with the same name as the original and a .nksc extension.

    Given that XMP is an Adobe file format it is possible that other editing software generates a similar file but with a different extension. I don't use image management software, I simply file by year and month then sort by date and time, so I have no experience of how such software works. This obviously makes it difficult for me to make specific suggestions but I would suggest that cerebros looks at software first to determine whether it does actually create/amend a XMP file or if it uses its own proprietary system.
     
  10. AndyTake2

    AndyTake2 Well-Known Member

  11. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Canon DPP saves everything it does inside the image file but I’ve never explored whether it does key wording or not. It didn't used to but a lot has changed. LR can read star ratings given in DPP. I’ll try later and see if DPP recognises a star rating given in LR but I don’t think LR alters the image. By default it keeps a database (the catalogue) with the information in it. That’s for the classic version anyway. I suppose the cloud version may be different.

    Edit: DPP does not read star ratings set in LR Classic. There is space in the .CR2 file for keyword information (IPTC data). DPP can read but not write it. LR can read it and may be able to write it to a CR2 file but I'm not going to risk it on one of mine. Exiftool can read and write IPTC data to almost any image file. I'd test, test, test as well as following the Exif tool instructions to keep a backup of the original until you are really sure the modified file can be read.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2020
  12. cerebros

    cerebros Well-Known Member

    My understanding, at least from the articles I've read and a few of the YouTube videos I've watched is that since Apple moved to on iPad specific branch of iOS they'd drastically improved file handling through their Files app.
     
  13. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I wasn't impressed by the Files app when it first appeared but it may have changed since.
     
  14. cerebros

    cerebros Well-Known Member

    I don't know if that would be a newer feature in Lightroom... I'm still on LR6 and you couldn't get that to do it as far as I'm aware (would have been great if it did)
     
  15. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    You can look. It is under the metadata tab in library. My LR 6.14 doesn't work as I am the latest 64 bit only apps MacOs.
     
  16. cerebros

    cerebros Well-Known Member

    I suppose it depends on the later uses you have for your photos. If you never need to pick, say, a handful of your best photos of robins out then I guess just going by a year/month/day filing system will work
     
  17. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Keywording makes it a lot easier to find something. I've got nearly 22,500 images in my LR catalogue. My keyboarding isn't perfect (far from in fact) but it does help. I also cluster jpgs by subject on Flickr which is another crude subject index.
     
  18. cerebros

    cerebros Well-Known Member

    I think my LR catalogue isn't too far shy of 200,0000 (can't risk opening LR up at the moment for an exact count as my laptop's running a big task in another program and at the moment running too many things can result in a BSOD cycle) but then there's a lot of just general family stuff in that, including action sequences, which inflates the number a fair bit. (Plus, I'm always loathe to delete anything unless it's completely out of focus, or so badly under/over-exposed that it's unsalvageable, although I am trying to be more ruthless at pruning out the dead wood)
     
  19. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    I can't work out if that's a typo and should be 200,000 or if it's 2,000,000 :)
     
  20. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    I cannot find an app to cover this, even LR mobile couldn’t do it although this may now be possible.
     

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