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Another project, to while away the lockdown hours.

Discussion in 'Classic Models & Marques' started by John Farrell, Sep 6, 2021.

  1. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    A Halina 35x arrived today. This is a viewfinder camera from the late 1950s, made by Haking in Hong Kong, which is styled to look like a Canon rangefinder camera. The shutter doesn't work, the lens is dirty, and focusing is stiff. It will be a nice simple project to get working properly.


    IMG_5078s.jpg
     

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    Last edited: Sep 6, 2021
  2. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Almost immovable focussing is common with these.

    I actually like these things, though have not had a working one since the 70's.

    S
     
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  3. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    I fixed up one of these 20 or so years ago, and sold it on - they are quite simple to take apart, and almost as simple to put back together...
     
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  4. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    The camera has been dismantled, all of the sticky old grease cleaned out of the lens, and the shutter cleaned and lubricated with tiny traces of molybdenum grease. The next fun job is reassembling the diaphragm.

    Taking the shutter apart
    IMG_5093s.jpg
     
  5. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    The camera is now (mostly) back together - I have to reglue the leatherette, which was loose. I found why they used a thick sticky grease on the focus helical - when dry, it's loose. The light grease I normally use for this doesn't tighten it enough. Reassembling the diaphragm was fun - the last 2 blades have to be slid under the rest, to seat properly. The blades are roughly stamped, and not flat, so they dislodge easily. This photograph shows the last blade waiting to go in. The operating lever then sits on top, and the mechanism is secured in place by the moving part of the focusing helical, which is held on by 2 screws.
    IMG_5102s.jpg
     
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  6. neilt3

    neilt3 Well-Known Member

    I've got one of these as well that looks in perfect condition .
    That doesn't work either ! :D

    Did they ever ? o_O

    John , if you get it working , let us know .
    Then in one years time , report back to tell us if it's still working ! :rolleyes:
     
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  7. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    I doubt I'll be putting a film through this, but it certainly works. The mechanism is quite simple. I'd expect this one to need a service in another 60 years.
     
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  8. neilt3

    neilt3 Well-Known Member

    The last shutter I worked on was on an Ensign Ful-Vue .
    Works perfectly and should also be good for another 60 years .
    Though it has to be said it's a bit more basic than what your working on !

    When I get time ( when's that ?!) There's a few cameras of mine that I need to give their shutters a good clean and get them working again .
     
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  9. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    I agree about the Ful-Vue - I have 1 with the focusing lens.
    IMG_1136s.jpg
     
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  10. neilt3

    neilt3 Well-Known Member

    You have the fancy one ! :)
    I've been looking for a nice example of that one myself , but whenever I've looked they've been overpriced for the condition their in .
    The two I have are the earlier one's . One with a flash sync socket and one without .
    When I stripped them down even the mirrors cleaned up like new.
    Only two focus settings on mine by pushing the lens in for distance or pulling out for around 3 meter , negatives come out quite well for such a basic camera .
     
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  11. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    As an engineer, few things are more frustrating/annoying than finding out that something is not working properly because of a previous bodged repair by someone else, partcularly a so-called "expert" or "specialist".

    Congratulations on your work
     
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  12. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    I was given mine about 20 years ago by the lady who bought it new, on a ship sailing from New Zealand to England, in the mid 1950s.
     
  13. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    It's not a bodged repair, but a cheap design. They used a heavy grease to compensate for wide tolerances.
     
  14. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    Oh.... so, poor design ?
     
  15. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    It works well enough. It would be usable, with care, even with the light grease I used.
     

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