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Abandoned

Discussion in 'Exhibition Lounge' started by sagamore, Jul 21, 2017.

  1. sagamore

    sagamore Well-Known Member

    This is the remains of a model of the American clipper Young America, that I started building over 25 years ago. I lost interest in it, and made a wooden tray that I filled with sand, and pushed the model into it. It has been outside exposed to the elements for over 25 years, and this is how it appears today. The hull was plank-on-frame, and it says a lot for the glue, that it is still hanging together after all this time.
    Bob
    Young America wreck (Medium).JPG
     
  2. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    It's a great study in how full size boats rot!
     
  3. sagamore

    sagamore Well-Known Member

    Ship - Not boat! :eek: Here is a real one. The old American square-rigger Jennie S. Barker, completed in the USA in 1869. Photographed in Grytviken, South Georgia, in 1983.
    Bob
    Jennie S. Barker Deck.JPG
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Craig20264

    Craig20264 Well-Known Member

    Which begs the question. What is the difference between a ship and a boat?
     
  5. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    They're all boats to me.
     
  6. sagamore

    sagamore Well-Known Member

    A ship always carries boats, boats never carry ships. But it is obvious if you think about it! Ever heard of:
    A battleboat,
    A flagboat,
    The tall boats race,
    A 74-gun boat of the line
    Abandon boat,
    Warboat.
    etc etc.
    Calling a ship a boat is rather like calling a trainspotter a trainspotter!:D
    Or calling a £4,000 digital DSLR camera a "box camera!"
    Or a steam locomative a "choo choo train!" :mad:

    Most of the British public take a perverse delight in calling anything that floats a "boat" even if it is quarter of a million tons! :eek:

    I am not all that bothered myself, but always point it out. Call them what you will! :cool:

    Bob
     
  7. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    So why would a ship have a bosun? ;)
     
  8. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    However, even the RN refer to submarines as boats...
     
  9. sagamore

    sagamore Well-Known Member

    Submarines have always been called "boats".
    Benchista. I can't be wound up on this! :) Call them whatever you want! :cool:
    Bob
     
  10. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    Not attempting to wind you up, only having a joke. :)

    P.S. Love your models. The wreck actually turned out really well in the end!
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2017
  11. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member


    That makes sense because submarines don't carry ships. On the other hand various countries did build submarines that carried aeroplanes!
     
  12. sagamore

    sagamore Well-Known Member

    Yes, I know!:) But the subject is such an "old chestnut" in nautical circles, and usually drags on forever, achieveing nothing and wasting time! :D
    But what do you think about the wreck of the Jennie S. Barker?
    Sadly, it was accidentally burned to the waterline shortly after by some misguided attempt to have a bomb disposal exercise on it!:mad:
    But I was pleased to have managed a visit before the disaster hapenned!
    Bob
     
  13. Fishboy

    Fishboy Well-Known Member

    I particularly like the picture of the windlass - the wood rotting away inside the iron bands while still retaining the original shape.

    Cheers, Jeff
     
  14. sagamore

    sagamore Well-Known Member

    Yes, that was a mighty windlass, and extremely impressive when up close. The ship arrived there in 1906 for use as a storship to the whaling settlement.
    Bob
     
  15. sagamore

    sagamore Well-Known Member

    Lady Elizabeth 2 (Medium).jpg
    Iron barque Lady Elizabeth, beached in Whalebone Cove, Port Stanley, Falkland Islands. Completed in 1879. Hulked at Stanley in 1913 after damage off Cape Horn. Photograph, 1982.
    Bob
     
  16. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    Seriously, get in touch with Getty.
     
  17. sagamore

    sagamore Well-Known Member

    What is it with this Getty? All I have heard is that they are pretty ruthless with any unfortunate who accidentally uses their images!:(
    Bob
     
  18. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    It surprised me that in spite of living in a Navy town, being married to an ex-submariner and surrounded by friends and colleagues in the Navy, even working for a naval contractor for ten years, I hadn't ever really considered the difference between a ship and a boat. I knew of course that submarines are boats which probably explains why, as a child I didn't 'get' the phrase 'whatever floats your boat' because to my mind, boats, (submarines) didn't float so it made no sense!
     
    EightBitTony and Roger Hicks like this.
  19. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    They must float some of the time or you'd need a very long tube to get in and out. ;)
     
    dream_police likes this.
  20. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    True. Although the means of access did feel a bit like a long tube when I went onboard - a long tube with a ladder but I take your point!
     

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