1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

A question for the AP bicyclists

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by SqueamishOssifrage, Jul 23, 2021.

  1. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    No - a stretched chain can destroy the chainrings/cassette sprockets but a chain in good condition should not cause undue wear. The thing is to keep an eye on the chain. So I now have a wear measuring stick and an awareness that it needs to be used every couple of months.
     
  2. dangie

    dangie Senior Knobhead

    On my Mountain Bike I use 32/22 tooth chainrings. I use steel chainrings for both of them. The slight increase in weight of steel over alloy is worth it for the increased longevity.
     
  3. SqueamishOssifrage

    SqueamishOssifrage Well-Known Member

  4. daft_biker

    daft_biker Action Man!

    They are very popular in the UK and have been making serious bikes since the early days of mountain biking (possibly before?). Trek and Merida might be worth a look too....it's a competitive market with lots of choice. Santa Cruz make some too....Danny Macaskill was riding one when I saw him down Caberston forest.
     
  5. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    It (Specialized) is common here, in Chester we have a dedicated store, not sure who the holding company is but it is the same company as "The Bike Factory" which is next door. A lot of the popular bikes are American. I have a Cannondale and Trek are another big company. They may be US companies but a lot of the manufacture is now in Asia.
     
  6. SqueamishOssifrage

    SqueamishOssifrage Well-Known Member

    The problem with Asian e-bikes is that the EU slaps a 39% import duty on them. Add 19% VAT and more than half half the cost is tax! That's not a joke it's a pantomime. :mad:
     
  7. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I expect it is the same here. Brexit or not HMRC won’t be rushing to reduce the tax take. Bike prices are high. There is always a big difference in price between this year’s model and last year’s model.
     
  8. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Pretty much any respectable ebike will have a range that suits. I have a Bosch with 500wH battery and have had 4 commutes out of it at about 35km each, using eco mode mostly. On sport or turbo mode that reduces to 2 with a bit to spare. That's into Edinburgh and back which isn't a lot of elevation but often features headwinds. It's a heavy upright bike with panniers - a Cube Compact Hybrid - so not especially efficient. Fat tyres are great for comfort and tram lines in town. Highly adjustable position. My model may not be best for hills as just 5 speed, but it has enough torque to get away with fewer gears. Don't recall ever using 1, as 2 can handle double digit gradients, but even that is rarely used as most steep hills around here are short enough to carry speed and stick in 3rd gear.

    Again, any respectable ebike will have no trouble getting you to that speed. However, they won't all be particularly stable at that speed or be good at stopping. Hydraulic discs are a must for me, mechanical discs just don't cut it.

    Annoyingly many bikes are sold as commuters or hybrids without racks, but ebikes seem to be well served with sensible specifications such as mudguards and racks. Many, like mine, also offer hard wired lights powered by the main battery.

    Very few have expansion battery options. Those that do tend to either have smaller primary batteries or less powerful motors. The expansion is often in a water bottle form so it can be held in place with standard bottle cage.
     
  9. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    The main problem in the UK is lack of stock and no idea when new stock will be received. I would like an e-bike but want to choose what I prefer rather than have to buy from very limited choice.
     
  10. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    The bigger wheel Cubes look quite good too. I don’t see why the bikes should seem unstable at 15 mph or higher, mine doesn’t but I admit I don’t like riding fast and 30 mph downhill is too fast for me. I’ve got TRP cable disks (auto-centred) which work well. Hydraulic disks were the next model up.
     
  11. daft_biker

    daft_biker Action Man!

    Hydraulic rim brakes (Magura HS33) are an excellent choice too. No disc brake I have ever tried in the last 25 years provide the same level of feel which is why they are still popular with some riders.

    Not all disc brakes are created equal but a well set up cable system can work just as well as hydraulic. The main difference to me is that cable disc brakes usually need the inside pad to be adjusted manually as the pad wears whereas hydraulic disc brakes usually self adjust if it is an open system with a fluid reservoir (the Magura rim brakes are a closed system and there's a dial on the lever blade to manually adjust). Cable brakes of any type benefit from quality "compressionless" outer cables and beefy inner cables, just like hydraulic systems benefit from steel braided hoses over plastic hoses. Whether cable or hydraulic if they have the same 160mm disc and same resin pads the ability to turn friction into heat is the same...there are some hydraulic discs that take the same little round pads found in most cable discs.

    160mm rotors, mineral oil, plastic hoses and two piece calipers bolted together don't cut it for me....I run 203mm front, 185mm rear with DOT 5.1 in steel braided hoses and calipers machined out a single piece of aluminium....and 4 pistons at each end...and sintered pads that can take punishment. 17 years later there is still nothing I'd rather have but they might be a little OTT for riding to work or the shops :D
     
    Zou likes this.
  12. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    I've ridden a couple of Volt ebikes which were so bad I'd ban them. Incredibly poor design, not stable at speed, toe overlap concerns, just shoddy really, and priced several hundred over the odds.
     
    daft_biker likes this.
  13. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Yes it is a problem at the moment, especially as you really do have to try the bike. Parts too. If I want to see the (non e-bike) I’m interested in the next delivery is August and, of course, they may sell them the day they come in.
     
  14. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    I ken a man up Penicuik way who has a garage full of bikes and parts. Pretty sure he can do leccy conversions too! ;)
     
  15. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Good to know.
     
  16. daft_biker

    daft_biker Action Man!

    £500 for the Whoosh kit I fitted for £30 because the instructions said 3 hours to fit....my prices will be going up after my holiday and research what bike shops charge. I've had no idea what bike shops charge to fix stuff because I've never let anyone else turn a spanner on my bikes since I was about 10.
     
  17. dangie

    dangie Senior Knobhead

    Unless of course you visit H*lfords where they’ll try to convince you that the only bike they have in stock is ‘perfect’ for you.
     
  18. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I’d reckon something like £50-£60 an hour plus parts is what they’d aim at as a business that has to employ, provide premises, pay business rates, VAT, provide services (heat, power etc.), maintain working capital and turn a profit.
     
  19. dangie

    dangie Senior Knobhead

    Same here probably with the exception of fitting a new headset and forks. I have an extremely good bike shop near to me and they faced the head tube, fitted the head set and cut the length of the fork steerer tube free of charge.
     
    Zou likes this.
  20. DaveM399

    DaveM399 Well-Known Member

    Ditto. The only job I have had done was cutting a fork steerer tube down several years ago. I have had several pairs of wheels hand built by a well regarded wheel builder over the years, who happens to live in the next road.

    I did rebuild an old wheel once where the rim brake track had failed due to wear. To get the lacing pattern correct, I zip tied the new and old rims together and transferred the spokes one at a time.
     
    Zou likes this.

Share This Page