We would all love to produce consistent professional-quality images, but doesn't that require the appropriate, and very expensive, gear? Not at all, says Tim Coleman, as he explains why Canon's EOS 1100D and Nikon's D3100 entry-level DSLRs could save you thousands of pounds

Lens and flash compatibility

For wireless flash, neither the Canon EOS 1100D or the Nikon D3100 features a controller so a separate transmitter, such as the Pocket wizard is needed.Lens compatibility is a major benefit when buying into a system. The Nikon D3100 does not have a built-in motor, so lenses need to be of the AF-S type in order to achieve full auto control with the camera.

All current digital Nikon lenses are of the AF-S type, but if you already have a number of older AF-I lenses, manual focus may have to suffice.

For an in-built lens motor you need to buy the D7000 model or higher. All Canon DSLR models include built-in lens motors and the EOS 1100D is compatible with all EF and EF-S lenses. The bodies are compact and lightweight, so a heavier and more expensive lens can make the combination front-heavy.

Both cameras have hotshoe connections for use with flashguns. For wireless flash, however, you’ll need to buy a separate trigger or use a flashgun as the controller. The Canon EOS 7D and Nikon D7000 models have more sophisticated wireless flash control from within the bodies, which is an area in which they surpass their entry-level companions.

Image: For wireless flash, neither model features a controller so a separate transmitter is needed.

  1. 1. Introduction
  2. 2. Features
  3. 3. Build and handling
  4. 4. Performance
  5. 5. Lens and flash compatibility
  6. 6. Comparison specifications
  7. 7. Verdict
Page 5 of 7 - Show Full List
  • MICHAEL

    Why only canon and nikon???? as usual

    PATHETIC!

  • Nurhalima

    While the posts cover either palopur topics and interesting questions (yes, sometimes these are mutually exclusive), but sometimes they need more substance. Scoping discussion from the community requires a bit more work.The 5 lenses posts can provide more relevance if you were to provide more use cases. For example, recommended lenses for a rookie with cap of $300 per lens. Or, 5 best lenses to live within a total budget of $3,000. Or maybe 3 best prime lenses for coverage in a $1700 budget, hitting on landscape, portrait and nature. Yeah, you can go nuts with this but consider the idea.