We would all love to produce consistent professional-quality images, but doesn't that require the appropriate, and very expensive, gear? Not at all, says Tim Coleman, as he explains why Canon's EOS 1100D and Nikon's D3100 entry-level DSLRs could save you thousands of pounds

Features

Both cameras have an APS-C-size sensor. The EOS 1100D’s sensor measures 22.2×14.7mm and is slightly smaller than the standard APS-C size, which is generally 23.1×15.4mm and the size featured on the D3100. The difference is so tiny that in terms of image quality it is almost unnoticeable.

However, it does have a small effect on the multiplication factor of the lens. Using a 50mm lens, the effective focal length of Canon’s 1.6x factor equates to 80mm, whereas Nikon’s 1.5x factor gives a 75mm equivalent from the same lens.

One advantage for the Nikon D3100 is its 14.2-million-pixel sensor, which has two million more photosites than that of the 1100D. The maximum image output is 4272×2848 pixels for the 1100D and 4608×3072 pixels for the D3100. This allows the Nikon to produce prints that are about 1in larger at 300ppi without interpolation. However, the level of detail is another matter.

When the 1100D and D3100 are compared to their most sophisticated APS-C-size counterparts, the differences are rather small. In the Nikon range, although sensor sizes are virtually the same, the 16.2-million-pixel Nikon D5100 and D7000 offer two million more pixels than the D3100, while the older D300S has 12.3 million pixels. The differences between Canon models are more obvious, with the 18-million-pixel EOS 600D and EOS 7D having almost six million more pixels than the 1100D.

Basic raw conversion software is provided with most cameras that shoot raw files, and the Nikon D3100 is no exception. However, for more advanced raw editing, Nikon’s Capture NX2 can be brought separately. Canon bucks this trend by providing its Digital Photo Professional software, which offers full editing control, for free with the 1100D.

  1. 1. Introduction
  2. 2. Features
  3. 3. Build and handling
  4. 4. Performance
  5. 5. Lens and flash compatibility
  6. 6. Comparison specifications
  7. 7. Verdict
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  • MICHAEL

    Why only canon and nikon???? as usual

    PATHETIC!

  • Nurhalima

    While the posts cover either palopur topics and interesting questions (yes, sometimes these are mutually exclusive), but sometimes they need more substance. Scoping discussion from the community requires a bit more work.The 5 lenses posts can provide more relevance if you were to provide more use cases. For example, recommended lenses for a rookie with cap of $300 per lens. Or, 5 best lenses to live within a total budget of $3,000. Or maybe 3 best prime lenses for coverage in a $1700 budget, hitting on landscape, portrait and nature. Yeah, you can go nuts with this but consider the idea.