The larger APS-C format of the Samsung NX10 goes up against the Micro Four Thirds system of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 as we test two micro-system cameras in our Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 vs Samsung NX10 camera test

Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 vs Samsung NX10 – Build and handling

Thanks to the removal of the mirror box and SLR mechanism, both the Lumix DMC-G2 and NX10 are smaller than conventional DSLR cameras. Given that the NX10 uses a fractionally larger sensor, it is surprising that this model is slightly more compact than the G2.

However, while this is true of the camera body, the bigger sensor requires a larger imaging circle than the Four Thirds sensor in the G2, which means NX-system lenses are larger than their Micro Four Thirds counterparts.

Both cameras look and handle like DSLRs, as opposed to the more compact-camera-like stylings of the Olympus Pen E-P1 and Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1. Similarly, both the NX10 and G2 have polycarbonate bodies that are well constructed. In an attempt to keep the NX10 as small as possible, Samsung has kept the size of the handgrip to a minimum, although it is still big enough for the user to hold it securely. The grip of the G2 is far larger in comparison, and much more like that on a DSLR.

Despite the small size of both cameras, neither of them skimps on features. However, each camera has a different method of how the photographer controls these features. Nearly every shooting option on the G2 has its own dedicated control on the camera body. In fact, there are few areas on the G2 where Panasonic hasn’t managed to squeeze in a button or control – and then, of course, there is the option to control the camera settings via the touchscreen.

In my original test of the G2, I wrote that I was a little sceptical about how well the touchscreen would work. My fears proved unfounded, though, as the touchscreen is responsive and it has on-screen buttons that are large enough to allow features to be changed easily. However, despite the touchscreen’s good performance, it doesn’t actually speed up the process of changing the camera’s settings. In fact, it is quicker and more instinctive to rely on the traditional buttons, switches and dials to control the camera.

Samsung has kept the number of buttons on the Samsung NX10 to a minimum, although access is available to key settings such as white balance and sensitivity via shortcut buttons on the rear of the camera. There are far fewer buttons on the NX10 than there are on the G2, which makes the NX10 handle much more like an entry-level DSLR.

Despite the huge range of controls on the G2, I prefer the build and handling of the NX10. To DSLR users, the NX10 will feel much more familiar, and its menu system is slick, well structured and easy to use.

  1. 1. Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 vs Samsung NX10 at a glance
  2. 2. Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 vs Samsung NX10 - Features
  3. 3. Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 vs Samsung NX10 - Build and handling
  4. 4. Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 vs Samsung NX10 - Noise, resolution and sensitivity
  5. 5. Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 vs Samsung NX10 - White balance and colour
  6. 6. Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 vs Samsung NX10 - Metering
  7. 7. Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 vs Samsung NX10 LCD, Live View, viewfinder and video
  8. 8. Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 vs Samsung NX10 - Autofocus
  9. 9. Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 vs Samsung NX10 - Verdict
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