The OM-D E-M5 is Olympus’s most highly specified four thirds camera to date, and its most attractive, but is its performance good enough to provide a lasting legacy?

Product Overview

Overall rating:

Olympus OM-D E-M5

Autofocus:
Noise/resolution:
Metering:
Features:
AWB Colour:
LCD viewfinder:
Dynamic Range:
Build/Handling:

Product:

Olympus OM-D E-M5 review

Manufacturer:

Price as reviewed:

£1,150.00

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Metering

Like all current Olympus Pen models, the OM-D E-M5 uses a 324-zone multi-segment metering system. The evaluative mode in the E-M5 performs as I expected. I tested the system in a scene with a wide dynamic range, tilting the camera down from a frame dominated by a bright sky to the same scene dominated by the duller landscape. There is a gradual shift in exposure as the camera is tilted down, neither underexposing nor overexposing too soon.

Spot metering works via the 35-segment AF points, which can be individually selected using either the arrow controls on the D-pad or the touchscreen. The inclusion of spot meter modes for highlights or shadows is useful for quick and accurate control.

  1. 1. Introduction
  2. 2. Features
  3. 3. HLD-6 grip and battery pack
  4. 4. Build and handling
  5. 5. White balance and colour
  6. 6. Metering
  7. 7. Autofocus
  8. 8. Dynamic range
  9. 9. Noise, sensitivity and resolution
  10. 10. LCD, viewfinder and video
  11. 11. The competition
  12. 12. Verdict
Page 6 of 12 - Show Full List
  • Swathi

    (Electronics) This flash is an adequate iepnexnsive alternative to a dedicated Canon flash. The automatic focus function does not appear to work with a Canon SX10is, but I can live without it. The auto zoom function works fine. It gives accurate exposures in the eTTL mode. There appears to be no built in sensor when used in the slave mode, so a few trial shots are required. Eats alkaline AA batteries pretty fast, so you may want to invest in rechargeables. Overall I think it is worth the asking price.