The OM-D E-M5 is Olympus’s most highly specified four thirds camera to date, and its most attractive, but is its performance good enough to provide a lasting legacy?

Product Overview

Overall rating:

Olympus OM-D E-M5

Autofocus:
Noise/resolution:
Metering:
Features:
AWB Colour:
LCD viewfinder:
Dynamic Range:
Build/Handling:

Product:

Olympus OM-D E-M5 review

Manufacturer:

Price as reviewed:

£1,150.00

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White balance and colour

Although most white balance systems in today’s cameras are accurate in the majority of situations, I have been impressed by the quality and control of Olympus models in this area for some time.

There are no individual colours that really fool the system, and the extensive range of white balance settings includes a manual Kelvin adjustment and an underwater preset.

As with most systems, scenes with any single colour dominant in the frame can throw the colour balance. In such a situation, taking a custom white balance is best, and doing so is about as simple as it gets. You simply select custom white balance, take a photograph of a white card and then accept the suggested adjustment.

The colour modes total 18 in all, including 11 art filters. For single-frame shooting, the vivid preset adds a welcome bit of saturation to colours, especially in low light where the colour depth decreases. Natural, though, is a good option for lifelike colours in most situations. A really handy feature is bracketing, and it is available for both white balance and colour. Recording all 18 colour modes in a single press of the shutter release button does hinder the speed of the camera, as it processes the high volume of data.

Images: The four thirds format has a greater depth of field than larger formats, which makes it ideal for macro photography. This image was taken with the 12-50mm kit lens in its macro setting at f/16 (equivalent to f/32 on full frame)  

  1. 1. Introduction
  2. 2. Features
  3. 3. HLD-6 grip and battery pack
  4. 4. Build and handling
  5. 5. White balance and colour
  6. 6. Metering
  7. 7. Autofocus
  8. 8. Dynamic range
  9. 9. Noise, sensitivity and resolution
  10. 10. LCD, viewfinder and video
  11. 11. The competition
  12. 12. Verdict
Page 5 of 12 - Show Full List
  • Swathi

    (Electronics) This flash is an adequate iepnexnsive alternative to a dedicated Canon flash. The automatic focus function does not appear to work with a Canon SX10is, but I can live without it. The auto zoom function works fine. It gives accurate exposures in the eTTL mode. There appears to be no built in sensor when used in the slave mode, so a few trial shots are required. Eats alkaline AA batteries pretty fast, so you may want to invest in rechargeables. Overall I think it is worth the asking price.