With an extraordinarily high maximum sensitivity, a 9fps shooting rate and HD video capture, the Nikon D3S will be looked at lustfully by many an amateur photographer. But are its 12.1 million pixels still enough? the professional photographer? Richard Sibley investigates

Product Overview

Overall rating:

Nikon D3S

Autofocus:
Noise/resolution:
Metering:
Features:
AWB Colour:
LCD viewfinder:
Dynamic Range:
Build/Handling:

Product:

Nikon D3S review

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Price as reviewed:

£4,000.00

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Nikon D3S Professional DSLR at a glance:

  • 12.1-million-pixel CMOS sensor
  • Maximum sensitivity of ISO 102,400
  • High-definition video capture
  • 9fps shooting rate
  • New ‘Quiet’ mode
  • Street price around £4,000 (body only)

In October last year, Nikon announced the third camera in its professional D3 range: the D3S. Although its body is largely unchanged from the original 12.2-million-pixel D3 and the 24.5-million-pixel D3X, it has a new 12.1-million-pixel sensor. The main benefit of this new sensor over the original one of the D3 is that it can capture images at an extraordinary sensitivity of ISO 102,400.

Although it may sound like an intergalactic sporting event, the ‘pixel race’ is something that is often talked about by photographers. Many want cameras that produce smooth pictures with little image noise, rather than higher resolutions but noisier images.

There have been signs of manufacturers acknowledging this recently, most notably with the launch of the Canon PowerShot G11, which has more than four million fewer photosites than its predecessor, the PowerShot G10.

So, while the 12.1-million-pixel sensor of the Nikon D3S might seem a little sparse when compared to the likes of the 24.5-million-pixel Nikon D3X and Sony Alpha 850 and 900, or even the 21.1-million-pixel Canon EOS 5D Mark II, the D3S is, in fact, aimed at a very different type of photographer.

As a weatherproof, high-performance camera with a high ISO sensitivity, the D3S is targeted at professional photographers who rely on speed and the ability to shoot in low light. However, £4,000 is a lot to pay for a camera with just 12.1 million pixels, and I’m interested to see whether Nikon’s decision to keep the pixel count at this modest level will work in the camera’s favour.

  1. 1. Introduction
  2. 2. Features
  3. 3. Build and handling
  4. 4. White balance and colour
  5. 5. Metering
  6. 6. Autofocus
  7. 7. Resolution, noise and sensitivity
  8. 8. Dynamic range
  9. 9. LCD, Live View, Viewfinder and Video
  10. 10. Our verdict
  11. 11. The competition
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  • Rajesh

    Hello 🙂
    I need a help, got something to ask. I own NIkon 50mm 1.8g and i have just used it 3-4 times and while using it i have found that the focus ring sometimes move”free” but the points doesn’t move, my lens work fine otherwise. Is it normal?