Tim Coleman checks out Casio’s latest Exilim model that is the size of a smart phone and features a unique swivel frame and screen

Product Overview

Overall rating:

Casio Exilim TRYX EX-TR100

Star rating:

Product:

Casio Exilim TRYX EX-TR100 review

Manufacturer:

Price as reviewed:

£200.00

Latest deal

Loading
TAGS:
While Casio’s Exilim TRYX EX-TR100 looks like a smart phone or a pocket video camera, it is primarily a stills camera. What sets this model apart from the others, though, is the 360° swivel frame and 270° rotatable 3in touchscreen. The design is a bold move and it will be interesting to see whether fortune favours the brave.

Build and handling

With its stylish design, compact 122.8x59x14.9mm dimensions and 157g weight, it is easy to see why many people mistook the TRYX EX-TR100 for a phone while I was testing it. The frame itself can act as a handle or as a stand, while the screen is easily rotated and great for self-portraits. In landscape format the rotating screen allows viewing from both high and low angles.

In practice, I found the frame useful when resting the camera on a table for self-portraits. However, I often discovered that my natural grip on the frame resulted in my finger obstructing the lens that is flush to the body, so I had to make an effort to keep my hand away from this area of the camera.

The lens is a fixed 21mm (35mm equivalent) f/2.8 Exilim type, which is a good angle of view for street photography. A 4x digital zoom is possible, but image quality deteriorates using this type of zoom mode.

Apart from the on/off button and shutter release, all controls are operated through the 3in touchscreen. I found this to be a little sluggish, and it was all the more frustrating because a lot of time is spent navigating through the menu to switch shooting modes.

Images of up to 12.1 million pixels at an output of 4000×3000 pixels are recorded on a 1/2.3in sensor, which is the same as that found in the Exilim ZR100. As well as JPEG files, the TRYX EX-TR100 records up to 1080p HD videos at 30fps. The similarities with the ZR100 do not end there, because both feature the Exilim Engine High Speed (HS) processor. Most of the shooting modes make use of the HS processor by processing several exposures into one.

There is no manual control over exposure, which puts the TRYX EX-TR100 in the point-and-shoot category, although exposure compensation can be set up to ±2EV. White balance with six presets, auto and custom, and ISO control at 100-3200, are accessed through the main menu.

  1. 1. Build and handling
  2. 2. Performance
  3. 3. Verdict
Page 1 of 3 - Show Full List
  • Ana O. Dumois

    Hi
    I have this camera and I agree 100% with your review. I just would have emphasized the difficulty, at times impossibility, of focusing with the LCD screen on certain lighting conditions. The outside viewer is really a most.

    Also, I´m not sure abot the quality of the 14- 42 mm lens, made in China since have not had opportunity to test it per se. For photos requiring this range, I prefer the Lumix DMC-ZS5 with its excellent Elmar lens by Leica.
    I find myself using the telephoto 45-200 made in Japan regularly and would like to see a review of both lendses. Thank you