Adorable dogs, Brits on holiday and a flashback to Photoshop 1.0: we collect the best links of the week

© Peter Dench

© Peter Dench

Photo Links of the Week March 7-13

 

Using a tripod on Hampstead Heath is apparently illegal
Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger found this out the hard way on a photographic excursion to the Heath, and received a written warning from the police for his trouble. As we found out, however, tripods are far from the only innocuous thing to be prohibited on the Heath. [The Guardian]

 

The British Abroad: Hardback Photobook by Peter Dench
An awesome Kickstarter project from photographer Peter Dench, The British Abroad (pictured above) is a chronicle of British holidaymaking behaviour in all its deeply questionable booze-fuelled glory. [Kickstarter]

 

“Has there ever been a time you felt guilty for taking a photograph?”
Feature Shoot puts this question to thirteen photographers, and the variety of responses is fascinating. How about you? [Feature Shoot]

 

How one photographer uses Instagram to bring a community together
This wonderful interview with photographer Matt Eich in Time Lightbox shows how Instagram has helped forge new bonds of understanding between divided communities in the town of Greenwood, Missouri. [Time]

 

Shared Sight: a photographer’s chance meeting with two blind girls who live under Beijing
Spanish photographer Albert Bonsfills spent five weeks photographing Lina and Mengchun, two insperable girls who live in a bunker beneath the streets of Beijing, sharing everything including just one set of eyes. A beautiful story, to which it’s impossible to do justice in a couple of sentences. [British Journal of Photography]

 

Irresistible portraits of dogs with their owners
D’awwwwwwwwwwwww. [It’s Nice That]

 

Mythbuster Jamie Hyneman gets a tintype portrait
This is a great look at the process of making a tintype portrait, it’s worth taking six minutes to watch the whole thing.

 

Photoshop Experts try to use Photoshop 1.0
CreativeLive get some current Photoshop experts to try their hands with the program’s original incarnation and the results are highly enjoyable. It’s amazing how far we’ve come!

“May I please return to the Creative Cloud now?”