Renowned war photographer Terry Spencer - a former winner of Amateur Photographer's Power of Photography Award - has died aged 90.

Renowned war photographer Terry Spencer – a former winner of Amateur Photographer‘s Power of Photography Award – has died aged 90.

Terry – an acclaimed RAF pilot who flew combat missions on D-Day in 1944 – also documented the early career of The Beatles.

Terry had already been exposed to extreme danger long before he started photographing wars.

As a former RAF Squadron Leader, he had flown both Spitfires and Hurricanes in the Second World War and was twice shot down.

Terry’s career in photography took off in 1950 when he started freelancing for Life magazine in South Africa.

This was the start of more than 20 years of adventures as he travelled all around the world shooting assignments for Life until the magazine closed in 1972.

He was one of only two British staff photographers on Life, the other being Larry Burrows, who was killed in Vietnam.

Terry completed three tours of Vietnam, as well as covering the war in the Congo, the Six Day War in the Middle East and the Biafran war, to name just a few of the conflicts.

Terry died on 8 February after battling cancer.

For more on this look out for future copies of AP.

An obituary also appears in The Times newspaper.