Today marks nine years since the death of renowned photographer Bob Carlos Clarke, who took his own life aged 55.

Carlos Clarke worked in many areas of photography including fashion, advertising and photojournalism.

The photographer’s untimely death stunned the photographic world.

The Little Black Gallery in Chelsea, London, today said it plans to exhibit ‘unique’ Bob Carlos Clarke photographs at Photo London, which takes place at Somerset House in London on 21-24 May.

The photographer (pictured) died after being struck by a Waterloo-bound train at the White Hart Lane level-crossing at Barnes in south-west London.

Before he died, the photographer had been a patient at the Priory hospital in Roehampton, where he was understood to have been undergoing treatment for clinical depression.

A book published in 2009 portrayed the photographer as a ‘troubled genius’.

‘Many experts believe him to be among the greatest unsung artistic talents of his generation,’ wrote author Simon Garfield in Exposure: The Unusual Life and Violent Death of Bob Carlos Clarke.

‘But he was also his own worst enemy, a troubled genius beset by self-doubt and prone to bad decisions.’

The book combined interviews with Carlos Clarke, his widow Lindsey, daughter Scarlett and the photographer’s agent, Ghislain Pascal.

The Little Black Gallery displays a rotating exhibition of selected images in the Bob Carlos Clarke Room.

Shortly after his death, his family set up a foundation in memory of the photographer, with the aim of supporting young photographers.

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[Photo credits: © Estate of Bob Carlos Clarke]

  • Still a great loss- his black and white work of Marco and his still life objects were innovative and ahead of their time.