The 'first major exhibition' to present a photographic portrait of Britain from its invention to the present day will open next month at Tate Britain in London, according to organisers.rnrnPicture credit: The National Library of Wales

The ‘first major exhibition’ to present a photographic portrait of Britain from its invention to the present day will open next month at Tate Britain in London, according to organisers.

Featuring more than 500 images by 100 photographers, portraits by Julia Margaret Cameron and Fox Talbot will line up alongside work by fellow legends such as Bill Brandt, Cecil Beaton and David Bailey.

‘It will show the extraordinary variety, scope and diversity of one-and-a-half centuries of photography in the UK, uncovering a range of remarkable stories about British life,’ said a spokesman for Tate Britain.

Called ‘How We Are: Photographing Britain’, the show will ‘explore how people have looked at themselves and others through photography; and how our identity – both personal and national – has been shaped by the photographic image,’ say organisers who add: ‘Portraiture and images of social documentary will appear throughout the exhibition, revealing both the public and private side of British life.’

The show is due to run from 22 May-2 September in the Linbury Galleries, Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG.

It will be open daily from 10am-5.40pm. Entry costs £7.50 (concessions £6). Tel: 020 7887 8888.

Picture credit: The National Library of Wale