A photographer’s notebook that was used on Captain Scott’s last expedition more than 100 years ago has been revealed by melting snow in the Antarctic.

George Murray Levick [Image, courtesy Antarctic Heritage Trust]

The notebook belonged to George Murray Levick, a surgeon, zoologist and photographer who used it to record dates, subjects and exposure details.

Levick was part of Captain Scott’s 1910-1913 expedition.

Writing in pencil, Levick used it for photos taken at Cape Adare in 1911, before he spent a harsh winter in an ice cave, according to the Antarctic Heritage Trust, which discovered the notebook and has now conserved it.

‘It’s an exciting find. The notebook is a missing part of the official expedition record,’ said the Trust’s executive director Nigel Watson.

George Murray Levick died in 1956.

Captain Scott’s photographer: Levick notebook conserved

The notebook is a ‘Wellcome Photographic Exposure Record and Diary 1910’

Watson added: ‘After spending seven years conserving Scott’s last expedition building and collection, we are delighted to still be finding new artefacts.’

Though the notebook’s binding has been destroyed by a century of ice and water, this has made it easier to separate the pages and digitise them, before repair.

Last year, the Trust found 22 negatives in photographer Herbert Ponting’s darkroom at Cape Evans.

In 2010, three crates of whisky and two crates of brandy were discovered under Ernest Shackleton’s 1908 base during conservation work. NZAHT Levick notebook pages 59B and 60A.webTo view more images visit the Antarctic Heritage Trust website

[Images, courtesy Antarctic Heritage Trust]