It is not illegal to photograph a police officer, military personnel or member of the intelligence services, Prime Minister Gordon Britain has said today.

It is not illegal to photograph a police officer, Prime Minister Gordon Brown has said today.

Brown issued the statement in response to an e-petition launched on the Number 10 website earlier this year.

The petition had called for Section 58A of the Terrorism Act to be withdrawn and for such ‘photography restrictions’ to be lifted.

The PM said: ‘Contrary to some media and public misconception, Section 58A does not make it illegal to photograph a police officer, military personnel or member of the intelligence services.’

Section 58A, introduced on 16 February, makes it an offence to publish, communicate, elicit or attempt to elicit information about any such persons which is likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism.

To read the Prime Minister’s full response click HERE

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