An MP has today urged photographers to take collective action in helping to train police officers in correct use of anti-terrorism laws, reports www.journalism.co.uk

MP Don Foster today urged press photographers to take collective action in helping to train police officers in the correct use of anti-terrorism laws, reports journalism.co.uk

NEWS UPDATE: Police chiefs failing photographers

Foster was speaking at a seminar in the House of Commons entitled ‘Who?s afraid of Photographers??.

The seminar, arranged by the National Union of Journalists, focused on the controversial Section 44 law which allows police officers to stop and search people without grounds for suspicion.

In the summer the Government limited the use of Section 44, to the stop and search of vehicles.

Foster, the Liberal Democrats MP for Bath, is reported to have told photographers: ?You need to talk about ways in which you can engage with those law enforcement agencies, in particular the police, to help work through with them what is legitimate and what is not legitimate.

?That means you have to engage with police in their training procedures with new recruits.?

He called on photographers to ensure that the Government axes Section 44 completely.

Last week photography lawyer Rupert Grey held talks with the Metropolitan Police on photographers’ rights and anti-terror laws.

Speaking to Amateur Photographer a few weeks ago, Grey stressed the need to ensure ?police on the beat are doing what the top guys are saying they should?.

For more on the journalism.co.uk story – written by Rachel McAthy – visit www.journalism.co.uk/news/mp-urges-photographers-to-take-action-against-future-of-s44/s2/a541268

RELATED ARTICLES

Photographers welcome Home Office terror talks

Police use Section 43 to stop photographer in Trafalgar Square

Photographers flashmob Scotland Yard on Fourth July 2010

Photographers can sue in wake of European ruling, says lawyer

European court rejects UK Government appeal

Police officers prevented picture-taking

AP’s lens cloth outlining the rules on photography in public places

Police chiefs: Everyone has right to take photos

MET GUIDELINES reveal police risk breaking law

Photographers win human rights victory over police

READ ALL OUR PHOTOGRAPHERS’ RIGHTS CAMPAIGN STORIES HERE