Photographers yesterday descended on New Scotland Yard to mark last weeku2019s landmark European decision that police use of Section 44 stop-and-search is unlawful.rnrn

Page 1: Photographers in 4 July terror law celebration

Jules Mattsson imageAmong those descending on Scotland Yard yesterday was 16-year-old Jules Mattsson, who last week sparked a public outcry when police prevented him taking pictures of police cadets in Romford, Essex

Photo credit: Chris Cheesman

Photographers yesterday descended on New Scotland Yard to mark last week?s landmark European decision that police use of Section 44 stop-and-search is unlawful.

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The event, which passed peacefully, was organised by the campaign group, I’m a Photographer, Not a Terrorist!, which has called on the Government to repeal the controversial anti-terror law.

Last week the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) refused to overturn its earlier ruling that police use of Section 44 stop-and-search powers is illegal, after the former Government had appealed the decision.

Police use of Section 44 had initially been ruled unlawful by the ECHR in January.

The legislation, which allows police officers to stop and search people without grounds for suspicion, has been heavily criticised by many, including photographers.

Among the photographers attending yesterday?s ?flashmob? was Jules Mattsson, who last week sparked a public outcry after police prevented him taking pictures of police cadets in Romford, Essex.

Mattsson had repeatedly, yet politely, informed officers that they had no right to stop him taking pictures in a public place.

At one point an officer told him that police do not need a law to stop someone taking pictures.

Many photographers praised the way Mattsson calmly dealt with the situation, despite being frogmarched away from the area and, according to Mattsson, pushed down some stairs after he refused to give a police officer his personal details.

Also present at yesterday?s gathering were photojournalists Marc Vallée and Jess Hurd ? who have both fallen victim to stop-and-search laws in recent years – and architectural photographer Grant Smith who was stopped while taking photos for a project about churches.

Meanwhile, the rules on photography in public places have been spelled out in black and white on a photographers’ lens cloth being given away free with Amateur Photographer magazine’s 10 July issue. The magazine, with lens cloth attached, hits newsstands tomorrow (6 July).

In January, thousands of UK photographers protested against police use of anti-terror stop and search.

This Home Office has said that it is giving ?full consideration to the [ECHR] judgement and its implications?.

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Flashmob at Scotland Yard

Photo credit: Chris Cheesman

Jules MattssonJules Mattsson, 16, has been told not to comment on the Romford incident while legal discussions over the controversy continue. The Met Police has said it is looking into why officers stopped him taking pictures of police cadets

Photo credit: Chris Cheesman

Press photographer Jess Hurd, one of the organisers of the I’m a Photographer, Not a Terrorist! campaign group, outside New Scotland Yard yesterday

Photo credit: Chris Cheesman

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Photographers at Scotland YardPhotographers at Scotland YardPhotographers at Scotland YardPhotographers at Scotland Yard

Photo credits: Chris Cheesman