The controversy surrounding photographersu2019 rights to take pictures in a public place amid fears they pose a terrorism threat is the subject of two radio documentaries.

The controversy surrounding photographers? rights to take pictures in a public place amid fears they pose a terrorism threat is the subject of two radio documentaries.

Stopped ? A documentary on Section 44 features interviews with BBC photographer Jeff Overs and architectural photographer Grant Smith who have both fallen victim to anti-terror legislation.

The thirteen-minute piece was produced by freelance photographer and broadcast journalist Andrew Stuart who has been closely following the issue over recent months.

On his website Stuart writes: ?The documentary came about because of a seeming rise in the numbers of photographers being stopped under section 44? This documentary looks into the issue, it explores why people have been stopped and what happened.?

Also interviewed is photojournalist and campaigner Marc Vallée and Pennie Quinton who earlier this year won a legal case against the UK Government at the European Court of Human Rights.

The documentary also includes comments by former counter-terrorism David Hanson, the Association of Chief Police Officers? spokesman on stop-and-search Craig Mackey, and Amateur Photographer magazine news editor Chris Cheesman.

To listen to the documentary click HERE.

Photographers? rights was also the subject of a BBC Radio 4 Law in Action programme presented by Joshua Rozenburg. To listen click HERE

This is the second time that Law in Action has tackled the subject. In a show broadcast last year solicitor Rupert Grey, a keen amateur and former professional photographer, spelled out the law surrounding photography in a public place.