One of the North's premiere photography galleries celebrates its 40th anniversary in 2017 with a new programme of events concerned with the region's history and influence

2017 sees one of the North of England’s leading photography galleries, Liverpool’s Open Eye Gallery, celebrating its 40th birthday with a host of new exhibitions focusing on their deep connection to their location – including the visual identity of the North, Liverpool’s position as a site for global exchange, and the history and future of the region’s people and communities.

Open from now until March 19th, the first of these is titled ‘North: Identity, Photography and Fashion’, in partnership with Adidas. The exhibition considers why the region has proved a steadfast inspiration to designers, artists and image-makers alike.

First opened in 1977, the not-for-profit gallery champions itself on its commitment to promoting the enjoyment and understanding of photography as an art-form, as social and historical document, and as an integral part of the cultural impact of disciplines from fashion to architecture.

In 2011, the gallery migrated to a new, purpose-built location in the freshly redeveloped Liverpool Waterfront, next to the city’s museum and close to Albert Dock.

About ‘North: Identity, Photography and Fashion:

“The North of England has had an enormous influence on national and international visual culture and fashion. This exhibition starts with the Mass Observation movement in the 1930s and explores The North through documentary photography, fashion editorials, video footage, garments and trainers, all the way to a recent Arena Homme+ article on the legacy of Morrissey. Supported by adidas and co-curated by Lou Stoppard (editor at Nick Knight’s award-winning fashion website SHOWStudio) and Adam Murray (photographer and senior lecturer in Fashion Communication at Liverpool John Moores University), the exhibition considers why the region has proved a constant inspiration to designers, artists and image-makers.”

Image by Alice Hawkins

Image by Raf Simons