Nikon D750 users have been asked to return their cameras for free repair after some users reported ‘unnaturally shaped flare’ appearing in their photographs.

When asked by Amateur Photographer whether this effectively equates to a product recall, Nikon UK has yet to comment this morning.

However, the latest service advisory notice about the Nikon D750, posted on Nikon Europe’s website, reads: ‘On December 29 2014, we announced we were looking into measures to address the issue reported by some users, namely that when photographing scenes in which an extremely bright light source, such as the sun or high-intensity lighting, is positioned near the top edge of the frame, flare with an unnatural shape sometimes occurs in images captured with the D750 digital SLR camera.’

Nikon Europe adds: ‘In order to reduce this unnaturally shaped flare, Nikon will inspect and repair light-shielding components, and adjust the AF sensor position at no cost to users.

‘We plan to initiate this service at the end of January. We will announce further details, including instructions for requesting servicing, as they are determined.’

For full details visit the Nikon Europe website.Nikon D750 product shot 14

Announced in September 2014, the D750 is a 24.3-million-pixel, full-frame, enthusiast-level DSLR.

Features include built-in Wi-Fi and a 3.2in, 1.23-million–dot resolution monitor – the first Nikon FX model to feature a tilting display.

The screen is built to rotate 90° upwards or 75° down – using a ‘rugged’ 3-axis hinge – and its colour balance is customisable.

Last year, AP exposed a potential security concern for users of the D750.

This prompted Nikon to advise D750 DSLR users to manually activate the security setting on Nikon’s Wi-Fi software app for mobile devices, to avoid the risk of unauthorised access to the camera’s images by a third party.

  • entoman

    “Not a recall” – who do they think they are kidding?

    The first question a potential buyer of a new or secondhand D750 is going to ask, is “has the flare problem been fixed on this body?”

    If the answer is “yes”, the second question will be “can you prove it?”

    That means that EVERY D750 will need to be sent in to Nikon to be fixed, and that any camera that doesn’t have some sort of certificate from Nikon to PROVE it has been fixed, will be regarded as suspect and much harder to sell.

    Yet again Nikon have dropped themselves in it, by failing to fully test a product before putting it on the market!!