The risk of losing precious images, due to the u2018throwawayu2019 nature of digital photography, is a central theme in a campaign launched as part of National Photography Month.

The initiative comes on the back of ‘shocking statistics that 64% of Britons do not print out and keep hard copies of their photographs and 77% of us no longer make albums’, say organisers.

‘The days of the family album are in danger of being numbered, which in turn leaves pictures to be forgotten in the oversaturated territory of cyberspace and the public’s hard drives.’

Fourteen organisations – including the Royal Photographic Society and

National Geographic – have joined forces with trade bodies, the Photo

Marketing Association and Photo Imaging Council, to launch the project.

They add: ‘Throughout June the campaign, based around the theme “Capture and Keep” will provide a range of workshops, tools and ideas that will help the nation create and safeguard better pictures that people are proud to share with future generations.’

Events will include a nationwide competition, involving 5,000 schools ‘learning through photography’.

And high-street names such as Jessops, Boots and Asda are set to feature in-store promotions.

Spaudau Ballet frontman and keen photographer Tony Hadley, who will serve as the public face of the project, said: ‘As well as encouraging us all to take more and better photographs, National Photography Month has such a positive message about the value of the photograph and I encourage everyone to be involved.’

For details click HERE

  • maria

    Good initiative and hopefully it will work.
    When you really value your pictures you print them, put them in frames, put them in albums as soon as possible…
    If you plan to print them in the future, you may find it’s too late by then (lost among many others or lost for good)