Travellers passing through London’s Waterloo Station can take their minds off the grind of their daily commute by treating themselves to a stunning exhibition of landscape photos

Hosted by Network Rail, the Landscape Photographer of the Year show, which is free to enter, features 150 images.

It takes place on The Balcony at Waterloo Station and runs until 7 February 2016.

This year’s winner of the £10,000 Landscape Photographer of the Year prize was Andy Farrer who triumphed over thousands of entries with his photo of Dorset’s Jurassic coastline (below).

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Andy received his award from the actor Peter Egan in a presentation ceremony at Waterloo on Monday evening.

After hearing of his win from contest organiser Charlie Waite, Andy said last month: ‘When Charlie called I must admit I was a bit bewildered and didn’t really dare allow myself think that this was the fabled “Charlie phone call”.

‘I thought I was hearing things when he said I was the overall winner. I’m not sure I was terribly coherent after that.’

Speaking at the time, Charlie Waite said: ‘Andy’s winning photograph of this beautiful area of Dorset’s Jurassic coast is a gentle image with a simple, effective composition that reflects the mood of a cold, winter’s morning.

‘It is believable and appealing, with the snow adding an interesting dimension to a classic scene.’

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Attendees at Monday’s presentation also included Julian Elliott who travelled from France to collect his Countryside is Great Award for the best image from an overseas entrant.

The Young Landscape Photographer of the Year was Mairi Eyres with an image of a daisy reflected within a water droplet, praised by organisers for showing ‘both photographic skill and ingenuity’.

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  • entoman

    Charlie Waite’s comment that Andy Farrer’s photograph is “believable and appealing” is worth noting, in an era when landscape photography seems to be dominated by artificiality.

    All too often we see star trails that the human eye can’t see, the cliche of seas and rivers transformed by long time exposures into a blur, and HDR scenes that look totally unnatural.

    Well done to Andy for a simple yet beautiful and very believable image, and to Charlie for his very apt comment.