Kodak this year celebrates 50 years of its revolutionary Super 8 Cine Film, a format that first made home movie-making accessible to the masses

Andrew Evenski, president and general manager of Kodak’s Entertainment and Commercial Films said: ‘Super 8 has stood the test of time. It’s the first love and experience for so many filmmakers, from first time users to Oscar® winners.

‘Super8 has launched careers, captured life’s most important moments, and preserved art for five decades. These are the same reasons Super 8mm endures today, and will remain a strong format of choice in the future.’

Last week Kodak held a series of workshops on shooting in Super 8 at the Cine Gear Expo in Los Angeles.

Evenski added: ‘Film isn’t just for the studio’s tent pole productions. It has always been a big part of the independent and emerging filmmaking community. We want it to stay that way and are here to work with filmmakers to make shooting on film a reality.’

Launched in spring 1965, the Super 8mm format included film, camera and projectors and was cheaper and more convenient that previous formats. An entire 50-foot cartridge could be shot without interruption, for example.

  • stuguy1

    Surely it was the 9.5mm format that brought cinematography to the masses?