Jessops has returned to profit in its first full-year of trading since it was taken over by Dragons’ Den entrepreneur Peter Jones.

The chain, which collapsed under its former owners in January 2013 closing all of its 187 shops, today reports an operating profit of £280,000, on sales of more than £56m for the year to 30 April.

Jessops says the results are proof that the ‘high street is well and thriving’.

Chairman Peter Jones said: ‘This is a great result and I’m excited that we’ve been able to restore an iconic British high-street brand.’

The news comes as Jessops today announces the opening of six new stores during October and November. This will bring the total number of Jessops high-street outlets to 34.

These will be in addition to the new ‘store in store’ branches that Jessops announced in a deal with Sainsbury’s supermarket on Wednesday.

‘With the right formula and strategy, the high street is full of potential for growth and job creation – our new stores will create over 100 new jobs before Christmas.’

Jones added: ‘Our strategy for success is a multi-channel strategy, within which the high street plays a key role.

‘It is all about giving shoppers choice on how to buy: either shop in-store (where they can get hands-on experience), order by phone, shop online 24/7 or benefit from the collect at store service…’

Jessops says it matches prices across all its retail channels and operates a ‘price match promise’ on those charged by leading UK retailers.

Jessops is set to open stores in Reading, Milton Keynes, Canterbury, Hull and Kingston in November. The first, in Tunbridge Wells, is due to open this month.

James Corden and Peter Jones

Peter Jones with actor and comedian James Corden, who helped promote the first Jessops store to open under the Dragons’ Den entrepreneur, in Oxford Street, London in March 2013 [Photo credit: C Cheesman]

  • GSpix

    Why should he? It’s the same company in name only.

  • Don Edmondson

    I rather hope not – I shredded £100 worth in January 🙁

  • John Fowler

    Will he refund the thousands of gift vouchers they sold at Christmas before they went bust in January?