Public fears over drones' use can be tackled with a ‘robust education programme’ for pilots, according to DJI

Kevin Gordon, DJI’s marketing man in Europe, explained how DJI is taking a ‘proactive’ approach to drone safety by working with the UK’s aviation regulator the CAA, as well as the Home Office, police and the military.

In an interview with The Video Mode, Gordon said: ‘It’s critical that people take accountability and responsibility for flying safely, and that we open up a dialogue with the governing bodies that regulate or are attempting to regulate its use…

‘Right now we’re [on the] fourth generation of the product, it keeps getting more advanced, and introducing better things like no-fly zones, which preclude people from flying near airports, or the intelligent battery system that automatically returns the drone to where it took off from if the battery reaches a critically low stage.’

Gordon said DJI takes a ‘common sense’ approach to flying.

‘We’re all about education, and we think that these fears [over drones] can be addressed by a robust education programme.

‘That’s why we’re doing continuous new pilot training sessions; in Brighton we have over 200 people attending in three sessions, talking about how to fly safely.’

Gordon highlighted some positive uses of drones, such as for inspecting planes, combating elephant poaching in Africa, and exploring volcanoes in Iceland.

‘We’re working with energy companies to inspect their infrastructure, we’re working with transportation companies, railroads… it’s really endless,’ he continued.

To read the full interview visit The Video Mode website

  • entoman

    This guy is completely missing the point!

    Responsible drone users, such as surveyors, professional photographers etc may very well take up offers of training, but it’s not them that we need to worry about.

    The dangerous people are the snoopers, and the irresponsible parents who buy these things as toys for teenagers.

    Irresponsible people will always avoid voluntary training, and even if training was compulsory (which would be impossible to enforce at this late stage), they would still act irresponsibly afterwards, simply because it is in their nature to behave that way.