Pinhole cameras made from empty cans have been handed out to hundreds of people in a project to record the movement of the sun over the next three months.

Pinhole cameras made from empty cans have been handed out to hundreds of people in a project to record the movement of the sun over the next three months.

?Over 420 pinhole cameras have been given out in an area of Bristol,? said pinhole camera expert Justin Quinnell who is helping to organise the project.

The cameras are being placed in gardens and ‘secure positions’ around the city?s Knowle West area as part of the Sunrise Project.

Organisers say they plan to collect the cameras at the end of June to coincide with the Summer Solstice.

?During this time, the photographic paper inside the camera will gradually expose, recording the movement of the sun,? said a project spokesman.

Organisers then hope to scan and edit the images and may publish them in a book, on a website or display them in an exhibition.

RELATED ARTICLE

Photographers to celebrate 10th World Pinhole Day

Picture: One of hundreds of pinhole cameras given out in Bristol to record the sun’s movement over the next three months. The one seen here is tied to a lamppost

Pinhole camera in situ