A camera-equipped drone has reportedly been blasted out of the sky in a dispute between neighbours.

The drone was reported to be a DJI Phantom 2 Vision quadcopter (above)

 

The owner told police he was taking aerial photos of his friend’s home, a property under construction in New Jersey, USA.

‘While doing so he heard several gunshots as he simultaneously lost control of the drone,’ Lieutenant Patrick Greene was quoted as saying in a press release posted online by Motherboard, an internet-based magazine and video channel.

‘Upon retrieving the drone, he observed multiple holes in it consistent with a shotgun blast.’

A local man was reportedly arrested and charged with ‘possession of a weapon for an unlawful purpose and criminal mischief’.

The shotgun and drone were seized by police.

The drone was reported to be a DJI Phantom 2 Vision quadcopter, which costs around £650.

In a poll conducted in the US last year, 47% of respondents believed they had a right to shoot down a drone if one flew over their house and recorded them and their property without their permission.

Last month, video footage emerged of an ‘angry ram’ attacking a drone in New Zealand.

In the UK, an Amateur Photographer (AP) reader said he witnessed a drone crash into a crowd at a classic car event in Brighton, East Sussex over the summer, sparking anger from witnesses.

Last month, AP published an article on the safe use of drones in the UK.

PHOTOGRAPHY AND DRONES – RULES IN THE UK

  • Ru_Anderson

    I do like the idea of being allowed to shoot it down though. Could the hunting lobbies reach agreement with PETA if there was a widespread switch to drone hunting instead of wildfowl? What would be the optimum drone hunting season? Its got to be more fun hunting something that actively dodges!

  • entoman

    Although I certainly would not condone using a firearm, it is hardly surprising that this has happened.

    The growing use of drones is disturbing, not only as a cause of invasion of privacy, but also because of the noise and the visual intrusion.

    These contraptions may be acceptable in sports arenas and a very limited number of other situations, but they should be banned over private property unless with the property-owners permission.

    Even more importantly, they should be banned from the open countryside, where they are a most unwanted intrusion, and may even scare wildlife.