This April is Global Astronomy month, and it’s no wonder that April was chosen for this event - there's a wealth of opportunities coming up for you to get you camera out and take some stunning photos of the night’s sky.

Throughout April there are lots of reasons to try your hand at astrophotograhy, with a number of opportunities to get some great shots. You don’t need expensive specialist kit to take great astro shots, and our range of guides can also help you learn the basics.

Take advantage of the chance to get some great star and astro shots using our guide to astrophotograhy.

Here are some of the highlights of astronomy events coming up in April.

Full moon / Lunar eclipse (parts of America, Asia and Australia)

Date: 4th April

The month of astronomy events kicks off on 4th April with a full moon. Also on this day, a total lunar eclipse will be visible throughout much of North America, South America, eastern Asia and Australia.

International Dark Sky Week

Date: 13 – 18 April

International Dark Sky Week (DSW) takes place after the new moon in April, where people are being asked to consider the effects of light pollution, and to participate by turning off their lights.

There are events happening around the country, and this is a great opportunity to take some shots of the night sky.

Find out the best places in the UK near you on the Dark Sky Discovery website

Find out more about International Dark Sky week

Astronomy of the Year competition deadline for entries

Date: 16th April

OVERALL WINNER AND EARTH AND SPACE WINNER: Aurora over a glacier lagoon

Overall winner 2014 and Earth an Space winner: Aurora over a glacier lagoon. Image © James Woodend

If you do manage to take any great shots from International Dark Sky week, there may still be time to enter them in the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2015 competition, ending Thursday 16th April .

See more details and some of the previous winning shots

New Moon

Date: 18th April

On 18th April there will be a new moon, which will mean the moon will not be visible to us in the sky, making it a good time to see, and photograph, other celestial objects.

Lyrid meteor shower

Date: 22 – 23rd April

This event, first recorded in 686 BC, promises to bring 10 – 20 meteors an hour that should be visible to the naked eye. The event lasts from 16 – 25th April, but should be at the peak between 22 – 23rd April.

Find out more about more

International Astronomy Day

Date: 25th April

Designed to promote astronomy to the public. Though practiced more in America than the UK, it might be worth looking if any of your local astronomy clubs are planning any activity to mark the day. Send us your best shots taken in the month and we’ll Tweet the best ones to our followers on this day. To send your images, email ap_online@timeinc.com, tweet us at AP_magazine, or add them to our Facebook page.