APu2019s ongoing campaign for the rights of enthusiasts to freely take pictures in public places has prompted an investigation by The Guardian. rnTen months after the 7 July terrorist attacks on London Guardian Unlimited sent reporter James Sturcke into the centre of the capital to find out whether taking pictures of London landmarks still attracts the unwanted attention of security personnel.rnLast year AP readers Roy Jhuboo and Adrian Stretton were among those stopped by police on the mistaken belief that they could be planning terrorist attacks on Canary Wharf.rnrn

AP?s ongoing campaign for the rights of enthusiasts to freely take pictures in public places has prompted an investigation by The Guardian.

Ten months after the 7 July terrorist attacks on London Guardian Unlimited sent reporter James Sturcke into the centre of the capital to find out whether taking pictures of London landmarks still attracts the unwanted attention of security personnel.

Last year AP readers Roy Jhuboo and Adrian Stretton were among those stopped by police on the mistaken belief that they could be planning terrorist attacks on Canary Wharf.

Visit http://www.guardian.co.uk/attackonlondon/story/0,,1763728,00.html