Take part and vote on this week's poll - Do you ever ask another photographer what settings they have used?

This week we ask – Do you ever ask another photographer what settings they have used?

Camera Settings

Camera Settings

 

  • Brian

    I have never understood why people love to see shooting data below professional images as it means absolutely nothing, most of the time. Those settings were dictated by the lighting present at the time of taking the image and the subject distance from camera, etc. In other words, if I saw a beautiful image of 3 swans on a lake and the photographer said the shot was taken at ISO 400 with other camera settings 1/250sec at f/2.8, how does that help me? If I take those settings as gospel and shoot a similar looking scene at those exact settings then chances are my shot will turn out wrong. Maybe there was less light in the original image and so I’ll overexpose in my lighting conditions? Maybe there was more light and so I’ll underexpose. Maybe we shot from different distances so I didn’t get the same depth of field and was expecting I would. Maybe we focused in different places. i.e. If you focus roughly a third of the way into a scene (as a rule of thumb) then roughly twice as much behind the focal point will be acceptably sharp than that in front of the focal point. The photographer may have focused on the middle bird to get the closest and farthest birds also in acceptable focus at the relatively wide aperture. If I focus on the closest bird the farthest bird may be out of focus.
    The only time I like to see settings is in situations where I think, “That looks like a really low light scene, I wonder what ISO was used”, or, “That image looks really grainy, I wonder what ISO was used”, or perhaps a long exposure was used on moving water and I’m curious what shutter speed was used.