Our Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II review is very nearly ready – whet your appetite with our run-through of the main differences between this new camera and its predecessor

olympus e-m10 ii 2

The popular Olympus OM-D range is continuing apace as the firm recently launched a successor to its budget model the E-M10.

The new camera, the E-M10 Mark II is no great overhaul, but simply takes what went before a refines it to make a sleeker and smoother proposition at the same competitive price that should prove eminently tempting for mirrorless users.

With confirmation through that the camera is still on track, despite a few teething troubles in Japan, we’ve put together a quick rundown of what’s new…

 

1. Upgraded Image Stabilisation

The original E-M10 boasted only 3-axis image stabilisation, which was something of a step down from its bigger brothers in the series which came packing a 5-axis version. The Mark II implements the 5-axis version, which should greatly bolster its low-light shooting potential.

 

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2. New EVF

Say goodbye to the 1.44-million-dot viewfinder on the E-M10 and say hello to a new 2.35-million-dot version on the Mark II.

 

3. 4K timelapse

Take note – the E-M10 doesn’t shoot full 4K video. What it does do, however, is shoot 4K timelapse images that can be turned into videos. Previously on the E-M10, this functionality was only available in Full HD.

 

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4. A little burst of speed

The E-M10 Mark II now shoots at a maximum burst rate of 8.5fps, slightly edging out its predecessor which could reach a maximum of 8fps.

 

5. Touchscreen focusing

The arrival of an AF Targeting Pad means you can put the E-M10’s touchscreen to what is arguably a touchscreen’s best use – selecting your focus point.

 

6. Focus bracketing

For anyone who dabbles in macro this feature is something to get excited about. Focus bracketing allows users to take quick successive images with small focus differentials. This unlocks possibilities for techniques such as focus stacking.

 

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7. Silent shutter mode

A boon for street shooters, the silent electronic shutter on the E-M10 II allows for unobtrusive picture-taking. Ideal for capturing those candid moments.

 

8. High speed video

With a maximum video frame rate of 120fps, the Olympus O-MD E-M10 should be able to capture some lovely slow-motion video.

 

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9. New battery and efficiency mode

The new battery inside the E-M10 Mark II is a BLS-50. The camera is newly equipped for Olympus’s “Quick Sleep” mode from the E-M5 Mark II, which automatically puts the camera to sleep mode whenever the Super Control Panel is displayed and there is no user activity for more than three seconds. Olympus claims this can potentially allow the user to squeeze 750 more shots out of a single charge.

  • entoman

    I’m not a fan of Olympus cameras but I applaud them for the inclusion of focus-bracketing. The ability to quickly shoot a series of shots at slightly differing focus settings, and to focus-stack them either in-camera or in Photoshop, could be a great boon for macro photography, where depth of field is very limited.

    Using a small aperture of F16-22 brings in problems with diffraction, and a necessity to use slow shutter speeds of high ISO settings. Shooting at wide apertures and focus-stacking eliminates these problems, allowing the subject to be rendered sharp from front to back, but throwing the background completely out of focus.

    Thank you Olympus, it would be nice to see this sort of feature incorporated into firmware updates by Canon and Nikon!