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zoom lens for wildlife photography

Discussion in 'Help Team' started by Rob Barnett, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. Rob Barnett

    Rob Barnett Well-Known Member

    i am considering the purchase of a zoom lens 70-300 mm ?? for wildlife photography, Pentax are way out of my price range...any recommendations...Tamron...Sigma .. ??
     
  2. LargeFormat

    LargeFormat Well-Known Member

    Camera?
     
  3. Rob Barnett

    Rob Barnett Well-Known Member

    Ooops ! Pentax Kr :eek:
     
  4. P_Stoddart

    P_Stoddart Well-Known Member

    Well it has the focal length to shoot wildlife, it's not a fast lens though presuming we are typing about this one?

    http://www.jessops.com/online.store/products/66335/show.html

    But the noise ceiling is very good on the Kr at nearly 800ISO.

    The only other option might be a secondhand lens

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Pentax-FA...=UK_Lenses_Filters_Lenses&hash=item2ebc0946d5

    My view is a reasonable lens is better than no lens at all. Yes, there are better ones but unless you go secondhand probably will break your budget.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2012
  5. Chris Cool

    Chris Cool Retired

    True! And because images are digital. They are so easy to manipulate. Post processing is an important part of photography and should be used to sharpen and enhance pictures taken with any lens especially Unsharp Mask and Levels... :)
     
  6. P_Stoddart

    P_Stoddart Well-Known Member

    Yeah, and that is the trick, enhancing to a level that looks naturals and not in your face. Like NR, HDR etc.

    You get things as close as you can within the limits of the kit then just add a small % in post shooting.

    You can even do this with film shots as well to a certain degree. :)
     
  7. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    zoom lenses offer a lot of flexibility but if the particular wildlife in question means using the lens at 300 more or less preferentially then a fixed focal length may be a better option and will be faster and better quality as like or not.
     
  8. BrianWall

    BrianWall Well-Known Member

    I'd consider a fixed 300mm lens with a tele extender. A fixed lens will almost always be better than a zoom and so using an extender won't have too much of an impact on quality. However, you'll loose a couple of stops. For wildlife this shouldn't matter at that focal length but may make autofocus difficult or impossible.

    I use a 300mm zoom and find that too short really, but a longer lens can be very hard to keep steady and focused spot-on. I'm still practicing a lot!!
     

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