1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Dear Guest,

    Apologies for the issues that you may be experiencing with the AP forum. While not ideal, it is reported that access can be gained by using Internet Explorer or MS Edge browsers. Hopefully normal access will be restored though perhaps not until Monday.
    Dismiss Notice

Z50 now available for pre-order

Discussion in 'Nikon Chat' started by AndyTake2, Oct 10, 2019.

  1. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    And that wouldn't surprise me, either. Of course the R does allow this, as do the Z6/7.
     
  2. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Actually, using a DX lens on an FX camera isn't a pointless exercise. When I first moved to FX i was using a Sigma 28-70 f2.8 lens, on holiday in Cornwall I discovered that there was a problem with the lens that meant some focal lengths produced over exposed images and others "correctly" exposed ones. The only other lens I had with me that covered the 24-50 range was a Nikon DX 17-55 f2.8. As it happens this lens is perfectly usable on an FX body (without cropping) down to around 24mm so that was what I used. It was that experience that prompted me to dispose of my Sigma lenses and buy the Nikon equivalents. All Nikon FX bodies have a DX crop mode that allows just the central part of the sensor to be used when a DX lens is attached.

    Despite using DX bodies for a number of years I only ever bought two DX lenses, a Sigma 18-50 f2.8 and the Nikon 17-55 f2.8 which replaced the Sigma after it developed a fault.
     
  3. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    Well you can on an RF mount camera (with adaptor) - it'll auto-crop. 3rd party APS-C lenses won't. You can't mount it on an EOS DSLR or SLR, because the "S" stands for Short Back Focus; the lenses were designed to take advantage of the smaller mirror in crop DSLRs to have that shorter back focus, and they will (generally) foul the mirror on a full-frame (D)SLR.
     
  4. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I must admit to being slightly surprised at that Nick, but if having both meets a specific requirement, why not?

    I wouldn't have expected Nikon to produce a DX 50-250 for much the same reason but they have chosen to do so.

    It seems to me that the number of systems available from both Nikon and Canon is potentially very confusing for the newcomer. The range of sensor sizes available across the manufacturers is increasing too, Nikon have 3 sensor sizes, even if CX is effectively obsolete. Fuji have two, I am far from sure how many Canon have and then there is 4/3. That Canon, Nikon and Fuji have systems using essentially the same size (APS-C) sensor under different names can't be helping.
     
  5. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    I think it's just called 1" these days. ;)
     
  6. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    I find using DX lenses on my FX D800 well worthwhile for general photography when out walking! When I planned switching from a Pentax manual focus film outfit to digital, I realized that a full frame outfit would be heavier than I wanted to carry, and also cost more than I wanted to spend in one go on kit that was novel to me. I chose the 12 MPx Nikon D90, DX 17-55mm f/2.8, DX 55-200mm telephoto kit zoom, DX 85mm macro and APS-C Sigma 8-16mm wide angle. Then Nikon launched the D800, and I realized that upgrading to it and a 24-70mm f/2.8 mid-range zoom would give me much more detail for the majority of my shots without adding much weight, and a minor upgrade to 15MPx with my other DX lenses. I still carry the DX telephoto and wide angle lenses in my bag most of the time. I now have the Nikkor 105mm macro, which I carried during the summer for butterflies, etc, but now I’ve substituted the DX 85mm macro which is less than half the weight, and still takes acceptable shots.

    I’m relieved that I chose Nikon, giving me a good upgrade path, and not Canon, or upgrading to full frame probably wouldn’t have seemed practical. And with Canon’s M system, you’d need a complete fresh start (apart perhaps for flash units) to switch to the R system, with little incentive to remain with Canon.

    Nikon’s Z mount is large enough to avoid difficulties with large aperture lenses, unlike the F mount and Sony’s mirrorless. I don’t know whether it forces DX Z-mount lenses to be significantly larger than would otherwise be necessary.

    If I was starting from a clean sheet, looking for a camera in the Z50’s price range, I would see its main weakness, other than the inevitably very limited initial lens range, as the omission of IBIS.


    Chris
     
  7. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    I daresay that will arrive in due course, the usual technology drip.

    If I was starting from scratch with an APS-C sensor size camera, no question about it, I would go for Fujifilm.
     
  8. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    Yes, if I wanted a quality APS-C system, Fujifilm seem to offer by far the best range of lenses. But they’re also rather slow with IBIS. I take most shots with a mid-range zoom, and I assume the 16-55mm F2.8 is their best, but it isn’t stabilized, which currently forces a choice between the X-T3 without IBIS or the X-H1 with an older, inferior, sensor.

    Chris
     
  9. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I don't know why there is a down on the X-H1 but it has been selling new at £999 body with grip. Amazing price. I thought I did very well getting one at £1200 mint s/h.
     
  10. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    You might be surprised, the 18-55 f2.8-4, which is stabilised is a class act, iirc on test it was just as good as the 16-55. It is also much lighter, I have a 16mm prime, which is light and doesn't really need stabilisation. There is a new 16-80 f4 as well, which has IS.
     
  11. beatnik69

    beatnik69 Well-Known Member

    I quite like the look of the Z50. I could keep my existing lenses and get the adapter for them. One thing I would miss would be the flash commander mode for CLS. I see they also sell a blue tooth remote. Surely it would have made more sense to allow your phone to do this.
     
  12. AndyTake2

    AndyTake2 Well-Known Member

    Nikon? Allowing you to do something for free?
    Are you mad?:p
     
    beatnik69 likes this.
  13. beatnik69

    beatnik69 Well-Known Member

    Eternal optimist. :D
     
  14. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Does Snaplink work as a remote?
     
  15. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Still waiting for an answer.
     
  16. AndyTake2

    AndyTake2 Well-Known Member

    You can tell how many of us use Snaplink:D
     

Share This Page