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You can't win can you Andy?

Discussion in 'AP Magazine Feedback & Suggestions' started by Learning, Jun 4, 2017.

  1. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    "However for Nikon users needing a stabilised wide angle, it's the only game in town,...."
    And before the magzine comes off the press, what does Nikon do?
    A 10-20 VR DX for a little over three hundred quid.
    I hope that our editor lets you do a comparison.
     
  2. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    One of my favourite expressions of Sod's Law is "Anything that can go wrong, will. Anything that can't is just waiting for the opportunity."

    The other comes from my first wife: "Sod's Law states the opposite."

    Then again, I can't help wondering how much image stabilization is needed with wide angles.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
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  3. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    or even AF.
    Providing that there is a rough focussing scale.
    I suppose for dim interior lighting when one has been too lazy to carry a tripod VR is a nice to have. Neither of the two new lenses (Tamron or Nikon) seems likely to make me replace my very old sigma 10-20, especially as I rarely am even carrying that when I want it.
     
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  4. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    Never mind too lazy, it's very handy for the interior of buildings where a tripod isn't allowed.
     
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  5. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    A valid point. The NT are particulary bad. Even if you are a member you even have to smuggle your camera in and get a snap quick.
     
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  6. Gezza

    Gezza Well-Known Member

    NT now allow photography in most places for personal use.
     
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  7. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    So I understand. Some of our volunteers do not.
     
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  8. Andy Westlake

    Andy Westlake AP Staff

    Yeah it was nice of Nikon to do that just as the magazine had gone to press. But you can buy the Tamron now while the Nikon is pre-order only, so it's still sort-of true. And the Tamron is a bit faster and weather-sealed, so it's a step up from the Nikon in some ways.

    I used to think wideangles didn't need image stabilisation too, until I started shooting with image-stabilised wideangles at shutter speeds of 1/2 sec hand-held. It lets you keep ISOs low, or use slow shutter speeds for creative blur (think waterfalls or fountains). Every single lens type can benefit from IS in one way or another.

    The new Nikon 10-20mm is high on our list for review, hopefully it'll be just as good as the super-cheap little Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2017
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  9. El_Sid

    El_Sid Well-Known Member

    Even if it is it'll be no use at all to many Nikon owners since is one of these stupid AF-P lenses which don't work on most older cameras. Sometimes it seems to me that Nikon almost take a perverse pleasure in deliberately creating lenses with little or no back compatibility....:mad:

    On top of that what need is there for an lens with no proper AF/M switch? If the motor is in the lens that's where the on/off switch should be! :rolleyes:
     
  10. Andy Westlake

    Andy Westlake AP Staff

    Yes of all of Nikon's recent mis-steps, the odd back-compatibility issues with AF-P lenses seem to be the most unnecessary. There's nothing inherent to stepper motors that means you have to remove AF/M and IS switches, after all Canon hasn't on its EF-S STM lenses. And while the 18-55mm kit zooms arguably only have to work on the cameras they're supplied with, the same can't be said of the 10-20mm or 70-300mm.
     
  11. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Thanks for contributing to the thread Andy. I guess that you realise that my initial post was somewhat tongue in cheek. Nevertheless it seems to have caused some debate on the value of VR for wide angle lenses.
     
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  12. El_Sid

    El_Sid Well-Known Member

    Maybe if you point this out when you review the lens they might take notice - one can always hope:rolleyes::D...
     
  13. Done_rundleCams

    Done_rundleCams AP Forum Ambassador to Canada

    Hi Andy,

    If it is as good and/or priced similarly to the EF-S 10-18, it really should sell well and will be a nice bonus to the Nikon 3 and 5K crowd of photographers :) and, truth be told,
    I'm surprised that Nikon took so long to come out with it. :eek:

    I know, we're going to be ordering a few and, like the Canon 10-18, should be some competition to the Sigma 10-20/3.5 and the Tokina 11-20/2.8.

    Cheers,

    Jack
     
  14. Fishboy

    Fishboy Well-Known Member

    I've nothing against stabilised lenses, in fact many of my lenses have that very feature, however if you've waving the lens about all over the place its not going to do you much good. There's much to be said for a good grip on the camera and a solid, steady stance.

    I was taught to hold the camera steady before I was allowed to even think about pressing the shutter, and all of my rules on exposure (I wasn't allowed to use a meter until I could estimate the exposure without one by the rack o' th' eye) were built around a shutter speed of a sixtieth.

    Couple that with the fact that it's better to turn off any vibration reduction if the camera is on a tripod and that the fact that the camera might be steady for half a second exposure, but your subjects aren't necessarily going to be, and you reach my opinion of VR/IS/OIS: like many features of modern cameras it's great to have when you need it, but just as important to know when you don't need it!

    Cheers, Jeff
     

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