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When all you had was your mobile...

Discussion in 'Smartphone photography' started by plugsnpixels, Dec 29, 2016.

  1. plugsnpixels

    plugsnpixels Well-Known Member

    I’ve got a DSLR in a camera bag in the closet and a non-DSLR superzoom camera in my work bag which would also have to be dug out, but my iPhone is always nearby at home or on my hip when I go out. So chances are any photo I take on the fly will be with the mobile.

    I usually end up shooting sunsets, general scenics, architecture or events. Here are a few examples of my iPhone photos with a bit of post-processing to make them less crappy and more interesting, I think… Feel free to add yours with a bit of a story behind them.

    iphonearchitecture.jpg iphonerepent.jpg iphonewaterside.jpg iphonesunset.jpg iphonebottlelight.jpg
     
    daft_biker, Zou and Andrew Flannigan like this.
  2. Ccc

    Ccc Member

    These are a few
     

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  3. Ccc

    Ccc Member

    Here is the other
     

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  4. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Very nice pictures, plugsnpixels. Unfortunately my 15-year-old portable doesn't take pictures at all, nor do I carry it more than a few times a month, so I am forced to carry a camera. And you know, it really isn't a great hardship.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
    Learning and Ccc like this.
  5. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    Like Roger, my phone gets carried a couple of times a month. It does have a camera, a 3MP one, with the usual sort of digital zoom, I think.
    So, my pocket camera gets carried all the time. That has 12MP and a 7x optical zoom.
    OK, so the LF1 weighs about 7oz as opposed to the Xperia's 4oz. But that works out at only .75MP per oz for the E1, as opposed to 1.7 for the LF1.

    'course, if you take the relative prices into account... but that would be silly! o_O
     
  6. Fishboy

    Fishboy Well-Known Member

    Because I always have a bag with me I've always got a 'proper' camera with me - usually a Nikon D3 with a 50mm lens fitted.

    My mobile telephone has a rather good camera on it that allows me to adjust the ISO, choose auto or manual focus, change the white balance and so forth.

    In a straight race my telephone can be in my hand far more quickly than my camera, however choosing the appropriate setting on my phone is a pain in the bottom compared to my camera which is second nature. On balance, if I want to take a picture of something, for me the camera is always the best bet.

    I've got nothing against mobile telephone photography - I suspect that it's more a case of feeling comfortable with what I'm used to.

    Of the examples you've posted I really like the atmosphere of the fourth one with the building and the cars parked - I'm not usually keen on processing that turns an image into something so different but for that picture I'm happy to make an exception!

    Cheers, Jeff
     
  7. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    I've seen some amazing iphone photographs but I haven't taken any. I used to have a previous version of an iphone, and someone bought me the set of lenses that you could fit over the camera to get macro/wide angle/fisheye shots. That was fun. But when my phone eventually died and I had to upgrade to a newer model, the lenses didn't fit. I didn't feel like paying nearly £100 for a new set that fit the new phone which had just cost me an arm and a leg already so I didn't bother, and I find the limitations of the iphone camera don't make up for the convenience of having it.
     
  8. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Whereas I find that the price and limitations of mobile phone cameras, to say nothing of the inconvenience of carrying a mobile phone at all times, make it a very poor substitute for a camera. What do people pay per month for this "convenience"? Let alone the price of the 'phone? As far as I can see, monthly subscriptions are about the same as for buying a basic 'phone outright. I use a 15-year-old pay-as-you-go phone which is dying by inches. When it dies, I'll replace it with a basic Nokia. Or even something second-hand.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  9. Fishboy

    Fishboy Well-Known Member

    Each to their own Mr Hicks!

    Personally I find that the ability to access e-mails, look up things on the internet, play music, set alarms, send and receive text messages and...yes...make and receive telephone calls whilst away from a land line all easily justify my monthly payment, however the importance of these features to an individual will always vary dependent on the type of lifestyle they lead, the requirements of their employment and the alternatives available in the location in which they live.

    If I was cycling along quiet country roads to pick up some bread from a boulangerie in a nearby village I'd revel in the sights and sounds of the countryside. Sitting on a 464 bus from Rochdale to Rawtenstall, surrounded by barely-sentient mouth-breathers conversing in grunts, I prefer to stick on a pair of headphones and listen to some music.

    Nowadays, if I decide to sample a few pints of foaming ale in the centre of Rochdale and decide to treat myself to a taxi home the only way to call down a vehicle is to contact the company by mobile telephone. I don't know of a pub in town that has a public telephone on the premises, nor can I recall the location of a working public telephone anywhere on the streets of the town centre.

    As I say, each to their own, Mr Hicks, each to their own!

    Cheers, Jeff
     
  10. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    Well I paid for my phone outright and have the whole family on a contract I negotiated which means it is now cheaper to use our mobiles than the landline, which we only keep because BT provide our broadband. However, the convenience I was referring to was the fact that because I do live a life where I always carry my phone around, it means I always have its camera available to me. It's just that I don't find that camera to be much good for anyting other than notetaking and so I always have an 'actual' camera of some sort on me too!

    As Jeff has pointed out above, lifestyle has a lot to do with it. My train commute to Glasgow takes up three hours of my day. I use that time to dicate thoughts into the phone's voice memo app, or listen to music via my itunes account, or send emails or catch up with Amateur Photographer, or read whatever book is currently on my kindle without having to take my actual kindle. I also have an almost adult child with Aspergers and severe asthma who lives on the other side of the country while he's at university and being able to text or imessage each other provides comfort and sanity for us both. As a parent in general, knowing that your nearly 14 year old can phone you if she feels unsafe and ask you to come and get her is reassuring, and being able to call your wayward 17 year old back for a telling off is very satisfying.

    There are times when I wish I didn't have the phone. It is sometimes nice to switch it off, or find you've hit a deadspot and can't be bothered by people calling/texting you when you're longing for a bit of peace and quiet. But it's also amazing to be able to Facetime my brother in Australia even when I'm at school. So, swings and roundabouts and horses for courses. And any other apt clichés you can come up with!
     
  11. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    For the last few years I've bought second hand iPhones. They've worked out at a few pounds per month, allowing for their sell-on prices. The main reason I have iPhones is for one application that isn't available on the Android system which happens to be my main reason for wanting a smart phone at all.
     
  12. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Sure, there's no question that it's very much a question of lifestyle. But mine has never had much need of a mobile 'phone. If I'm travelling, I always have a camera with me -- part of my job, after all -- and outside the EU mobiles often don't work on the local network. Although I can check e-mails and read the Guradian on my Kindle in Arles, I don't really want to: there are times when I want to live in the moment rather than on the internet. Most of us (me included) do too many things just because we can.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  13. Ccc

    Ccc Member

    This I probably took 6 months ago
     

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  14. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Like Roger I don't have a so called smart camera phone. I use a Nokia 3330e for telephony. I believe it also has the ability to use text messaging alhough I have only figured out how to delete such distractions and do not use the function. I tell a lie, I have used it, very rarely with the aid of the instruction manual, to authenticate some banking transactions, but that was the only very few times.
    I reckn that my very pocketable Sony Rx100 M3 with its 1" sensor makes much better photographs than any smartphone produced to date. I'm not a total old fart. If Sony were to introduce a mark 6 version of their Rx100 series cameras, and included SMS and telephonic functions then I would consider buying one. If such a device could also function as a remote controller for my Nikon DSLRs then so much the better.
     

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