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What grinds your gears?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by retrofit, Nov 20, 2016.

  1. willie45

    willie45 Well-Known Member

    I wish they would limit the speed of these disabled motor things to an normal walking rate ie 3 miles an hour. The number of times one's gone whizzing by me with some geriatric incompetent on board with no thought to life and limb is frightening.

    I was out with a work colleague a while back in a shopping mall, and one, going at a fair old lick, banged into her leg. She screeched in pain and stopped to examine the damage.

    The driver gave her a filthy look and remonstrated with her for not being more considerate. "I'm disabled", he shouted. Now few drivers of these things are so rude but a great number seem to be every bit as idiotic and dangerous.
     
    Catriona likes this.
  2. Wheelu

    Wheelu Well-Known Member

    Inefficient people in general. Those that appear fit and healthy but walk incredibly slowly, and probably diagonally, in busy places. Those who occupy space while playing with a mobile phone, completely oblivious to the world around them. The aforementioned morons at checkouts who spend forever messing about with bags, money/cards and (probably out of date) coupons, then engage the till operator in pointless long winded conversations. ( Supermarkets should regularly test and grade their customers. Efficient people would get to use the express lanes, while sluggards would have to queue behind their like minded brethren. ) Taking this further, pedestrian laybys for people to use their phones - no walking and typing or talking, and a slow lane for dawdlers etc , etc ;)
     
  3. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    This is Roger!:D
     
  4. Footloose

    Footloose Well-Known Member

    This may or may not be relished by some here; a proposal is being put forward that supermarkets designate check-outs specifically for older people who wish to chat with the staff, because of things like loneliness. What's going to be next I wonder? One for patronising customers on the way through, by giving them a 'Benny Hill' slap-heading?
     
    Andrew Flannigan likes this.
  5. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Craig,

    Of course I'm breaking the law. And you know what? I don't care! Why would I? Nor does anyone else, except those with a slave mentality.

    What is a law for, after all? To improve the lives of those who are subject to it. It is NOT to satisfy the whims of those with strongly authoritarian tendencies and no imagination. Your statement that "flouting the statute book willy nilly just to suit your inability to cycle uphill is the beginning of a steep slide to Anarchy" is hyperbolic nonsense; "inability to cycle uphill" is a simple insult ; I'm not sure you even know what anarchy is; and to preface the whole package of drivel with "As you know..." is even more absurd than the statement itself.

    As Douglas Bader said, quoting Harry May, "Rules are for the obedience of fools and the guidance of wise men"; and as Sir Robert Mark said of the law on cannabis (I quote from memory) "Some laws are passed not to be enforced, but to satisfy public opinion."

    If I thought it was dangerous, I wouldn't do it. If it inconvenienced other people, I wouldn't do it. If I thought there was the faintest chance of getting nicked, I wouldn't do it. But as no-one is in the slightest bit harmed or even inconvenienced by my disregard for this particular law in these particular circumstances (hardly "willy nilly"), and as the French police appear to have considerably more sense than you evidence in your post. I really can't see what your problem might be.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2016
    Andrew Flannigan likes this.
  6. AlanW

    AlanW Well-Known Member

    Some folks worst nightmare :)

    [​IMG]
     
    Learning and dream_police like this.
  7. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    A Council which grits its own parking spaces but ignores the area around the primary school and housing estates. I just managed to go 50 yards outside my house for the first time since last Saturday!
     
  8. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

  9. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    Doesn't it work for you then?
     
  10. Dorset_Mike

    Dorset_Mike Grumpy Old Fart

    Some weeks the only person I speak to is a checkout operator, not quite so bad now living in a block of retirement flats but when I was still in my own house that was just about every week.

    Family and friends die off or move away and making new friends on the wrong side of 70 is not that easy especially if you have limited mobility.
     
    Catriona likes this.
  11. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Without directly quoting Roger, there is a world of difference between a lone cyclist taking a pragmatic approach to a set of traffic lights in a French village and a whole plethora of them doing so, at considerable risk to themselves and others in the middle of London. That the lights in the village are clearly not timed for cyclists may well be known to the local police who have more sense than to make matters worse. In London the problem is the exact opposite in that there are too few police officers to do anything anyway.

    Blind adherence to the entire law would be interesting: I look forward to seeing all of you in the butts on Sunday for archery practice. Mince pies will be removed from the supermarket shelves... what else?
     
    Trannifan and Roger Hicks like this.
  12. dangie

    dangie Senior Knobhead

    Take your time. Slow down. Enjoy life. It's gonna be over soon enough as it is........
     
    Trannifan and MJB like this.
  13. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    I agree and at the same time the great pig migration flies overhead, our MPs will repeal all the sillyness and simplify what's left so that everyone understands what's expected of us. :oops:
     
  14. LesleySM

    LesleySM Well-Known Member

    Slightly guilty of this as I bury my purse in my bag and sometimes can't find it before I get to the ticket barrier. Leaving purses on the top of even a zipped bag is asking to have it stolen. If I have a struggle to find it then it follows so would a pick pocket
     
    Andrew Flannigan likes this.
  15. beatnik69

    beatnik69 Well-Known Member

    I's been scientifically proven that people who have more birthdays live longer..
     
    abandonedbritain likes this.
  16. dangie

    dangie Senior Knobhead

    Is it possible to be 'slightly guilty'?

    :)
     
  17. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    Absolutely yes. It's saying Sorry, but thinking Up yours mate!
     
    willie45 and Trannifan like this.
  18. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Geoff,

    Which was indeed my point. There is a time and a place for everything, including riding on the pavement.

    The narrow main street of our village is now a slalom, with parking spaces partly on one side, partly on the other. If a car is parked in the street, there is room for only one vehicle between it and the opposite kerb.

    This leaves cyclists with three main choices:

    1 Insist on my rights and force cars to wait behind me (and risk being knocked off by those who overtake anyway)

    2 Stop whenever a car wants to go through

    3 When there's nobody on the pavement, and someone in a car wants to use the road, ride on the pavement. They go past unimpeded; I don't have to stop. Yes, there's the slight discomfort of bumping up onto the pavements, and the pavements are narrow, but the traffic moves smoothly and everyone is happy.

    Of course there are many times when the road is empty anyway, except for the parked cars, so I don't need to worry. But if there is motorized traffic, my preferred options, in order, are 3, 1, 2.

    As for "local police", they do the occasional circuit (2-3 times a day, maybe) but they stop only if they are asked or if they see something interesting. In their view, the purpose of astop sign is to warn you that it may be dangerpous if you dpn't at least slow down. A cyclist's failure to stop at a stop sign, when you can see that the road is clear for half a mile, is a sufficiently technical offence that I don't think they'd even slow down and wag a finger.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  19. beatnik69

    beatnik69 Well-Known Member

    Not proven?
     
  20. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    Also that more deaths occur in bed than anywhere else best to avoid it
     

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