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Using a century-old camera

Discussion in 'Web Sites of Interest' started by gray1720, Nov 13, 2014.

  1. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

  2. Isbella Jones

    Isbella Jones In the Stop Bath

    Is that up for sale?
    I mean as an antique it's really good one, but not so much price worthy because I think it can't give us the quality what we see in latest cameras like Canon EOS 700D DSLR and Canon EOS 5D Mark III.
     
  3. El_Sid

    El_Sid Well-Known Member

    Any antique value is less to do with 'quality' of the image and rather more to do with age and rarity. The fame or industry respect of any former user can also be a factor.

    Quality to an extent is quite subjective. There are plenty who would say that the creamy smooth image quality given by cameras of this age is preferable to slightly artificial crispness of digital image... :rolleyes:
     
  4. Sejanus.Aelianus

    Sejanus.Aelianus In the Stop Bath

    If we assume that it's a whole plate camera, then the equivalent sensor density will be around 300 to 400 megapixells. Just a little more than any current dSLR. :rolleyes:

    Mind you, even if you can find the film or plates, how much would each shot cost?

    :cool:
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2015
  5. 0lybacker

    0lybacker In the Stop Bath

    Nice bit of timber in that, Adrian. Last night I was looking at photos taken with a 1930s box camera but there was one from closer to the turn of 19th century also present. 620 spirals are much coveted among us. Cheers, Oly
     
  6. 0lybacker

    0lybacker In the Stop Bath

    Senator, if you want to give it a go, Silverprint had some 20x16 film going cheap when I was in there just over a month ago. £330, IIRC, down from £5hundred something. Little bit of slashing in the dark with a Stanley knife and a steel rule and you could be set up for life for large format photography. Cheers, Oly
     
  7. 0lybacker

    0lybacker In the Stop Bath

    Yaaayyyy :D
     
  8. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Adrian,

    A century isn't really all that old: I have a 12x15 inch Gandolfi made some time before the Great War, maybe even in the 19th century. The one plate-holder I've used needed a bit of light-proofing, but I've shot both film and Ilford Direct Positive Paper with it. There just isn't much to go wrong with plate cameras, and they're easily reparable.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  9. 0lybacker

    0lybacker In the Stop Bath

    Hi Roger, Denis Waugh used to use Gandolfi 5"x4"s on the basis that if they fell to bits, especially after being bounced & vibrated around in aircraft and other forms of transport, he could fix them with a Swiss Army knife and a tube of glue. :) I should have posted that on How Pros Think & Work/What Pros Do ... Cheers, Oly
     
  10. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    I posted a picture of my great-grandmother's 1884 camera complete with a portrait of her husband and son taken with it a little while back. The quality is really quite respectable although fungus has affected the lens since then and I doubt it would be so good now.
     
  11. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Roger,

    You could always put another lens on it. Make up a panel out of thin MDF and you're away. Or actually, fungus often cleans quite well off old, uncoated lenses.

    As for putting film in a plate holder, it's easy. Cut a piece of glass to size. Spray one side with low-tack repositionable adhesive. Stick a piece of film to it (you can even use a film size smaller than the plate, provided you mark up the ground glass appropriately). Load the film/plate sandwich as a plate. Shoot. Peel the film off the plate (which can of course be re-used) and develop it.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  12. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    Well, I didn't expect to see this thread rise Lazurus-esque from the crypt. I'd love to see the 12x15 Gandolfi at work (I can think of a few people I know who'd come over all unnecessary at the mere thought of it - if you ever find reason to be in Oxford, Roger...), and I've seen the other Roger's pictures and camera on here.

    Now, if I can just find it (moved house...), and the backing paper, and get some 120, and work out how I'm going to get it onto the backing paper straight (etc etc etc), I really must use this with some film rather than paper:

    [​IMG]No 3 Folding Pocket Kodak Model E-2 by gray1720, on Flickr

    (and take a better photo of it!)

    Adrian
     
  13. LargeFormat

    LargeFormat Well-Known Member

    I think it was originally 3 1/2 x 4 1/2 but as it has been modified to take dark slides it is probably 4 x 5.
     
  14. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Probably not. Standardized block-form DDS were easily available in quarter plate (3-1/4 x 4-1/4 -- I do not know of a 3-1/2 x 4-1/4 format, though there are larger "postcard" formats -- measure the print!). The "gate" in the back of the camera ain't gonna be any bigger so it would be perverse to change it to a larger format. Also, it always took "dark slides", except that they'd originally have been non-standardized book-form instead of standardized block-form: see http://www.rogerandfrances.com/subscription/ps large.html for descriptions of plate and cut-film holders.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  15. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member


    You often find cut film adapters in plate holders of all types.
    however it sometimes requires you to adjust the ground glass screen to use them. They are perhaps more often found in the single metal plate holders, as comonly used on the continent.
     
  16. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Terry,

    And with press cameras -- which may of course already have been adjusted. Experiment is essential! (Or use a depth micrometer).

    See illustrations of cut film adapters about half way down http://www.rogerandfrances.com/subscription/ps large.html

    Cheers,

    R.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2015
  17. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    I have just read through that article of yours and it brought bach many memories.
    One film holder that I used rather a lot in the 70's was the Graphamatic
    which held six 5x4 film sheaths in a casette with a push pull mechanism fo rapid change. They also had a film pack back which did much the same thing with preloaded film. I used the graphamatic on a super crown graphic with their strange, twist to cock,1/1000 bladed shutter. And kalart rangefinder,with a projected light beam for focus in the dark.

    As far as I remember the graphamatic back could be used with any international back screen.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2015
  18. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Terry,

    Grafmatics are quite thick and although they can be used with any International back I have ever encountered, they don't fit under all plain spring backs. You know the difference: I post this only for those who do not. Also, if anyone has a working Grafmatic (i have half a dozen), be gentle with it. Those thin metal septums (septa?) can and do distort with rough treatment. And the counting dial is no longer totally reliable.

    Although I never owned a projected-beam Kalart, I tried one belonging to a friend once. Pure magic!

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  19. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    A question that popped into my head this morning, and I haven't given any serious investigation to yet - can you get an ortho film in 120 anywhere? That would be so much easier to fit onto a backing paper, and would also scrtach my itch to give ortho a go.

    If I find out first I'll post here.

    Adrian
     
  20. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

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