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Two faced

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by dream_police, Aug 9, 2019.

  1. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    I read today that the Church of England have criticised Wayne Rooney for signing to Derby and wearing his shirt emblazoned with 32Red, a casino company, as setting a bad example.

    Below are guidelines for the CoE from their Ethical Investement Advisory Group on how they can invest their £5bn assets. They can invest in companies as long as 25% of the companies turnover is in gambling, alcohol, tobacco etc (including embyonic cloning). They can invest in arms and pornography to make them even richer, yet they don't like poor Wayne being in a club sponsored by gambling.

    Where do they get the acceptable level of % I wonder? Surely dealing in arms, porn, alcohol, gambling, lending, and cloning should be unacceptable to the Church, or being cynical, would that reduce their portfolio?

    "The EIAG’s most recent statement of ethical investment policy, issued in 2011, includes both negative and positive screening. It advises against any company that makes more than 3% of its turnover from pornography, more than 10% from arms or more than 25% from tobacco, gambling, alcohol, high interest rate lending or human embryonic cloning. It also suggests avoiding companies whose management practices are “unacceptable”."
     
    RovingMike and Zou like this.
  2. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Is that why the CofE has never been a PLC or LLC:rolleyes:
     
  3. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    I don't need any incentive to avoid the CoE - or the CoS or any other hypocritical organisation.
     
  4. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    It is easier for a rich man to pass through the eye of a needle than for a religion to actually be a decent humane organisation...
     
    AndyTake2, dream_police and Catriona like this.
  5. Gezza

    Gezza Well-Known Member

    In 1948, when the Church Commissioners first invested in equities, the activity of gambling was excluded under the classification of amusement trade. In 1968, the category of “amusements” was relaxed and included the caveat of “suitable exceptions” where this seemed justified e.g. Butlins.
    In 1972, the Commissioners’ wording became more explicit and named gambling as a separate exclusion. The Church of England’s current policy is broad, avoiding investments in companies deriving more than a quarter of their income from gambling activities, but without further definition or refinement.

    Vicars will not be wearing cassocks or whatever they call them with "sponsored by Corals etc" on them, Young (not poor by a long chalk) Wayne will. I am certainly not defending the church but its not quite as straight forward as some would show it to be.
    I wonder if poor young Wayne will be paid through his companies to reduce his tax and I'm not saying that is right or wrong either, just an observation.
     
  6. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Poor young Wayne could help out Bury and Bolton players by giving them a months money to share to make up for missed wages
     
  7. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

  8. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    Why? It's not his fault that Bury and Bolton's players haven't been paid.
     
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  9. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    True but he could make a gesture
    However perhaps the Premier League Clubs should look at themselves
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-49288182
     
  10. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Perhaps if all the overpaid footballers paid a sane rate of tax the poor footballers could receive decent assistance. :eek:
     
  11. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    Might be better if they did. Some degree of transparency over where they get and what they do with their money wouldn't go amiss!
     
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  12. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    Some of the Bury players were earning £9,000 per week. Hardly on the breadline.
     
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  13. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    I didn’t know that. Perhaps they could share as well.
     
    Learning likes this.
  14. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    That's fine provided their WAGs haven't spent all their cash.
     
  15. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    None of them were on the breadline, but ssh, don't trouble the idealists with reality;)
     
  16. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Once people start feeling that way the churches have lost the argument anyway. It's a pity because I've met a few quite decent clergymen of a number of religions. Their problem tends to be solidarity with their not-s0-decent colleagues. :(
     
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  17. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    That is my current view and one that is causing concern for someone we know. Some of the things that are going on are so "unchristian".
     
    Catriona likes this.
  18. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    They would say that forgiveness and prayer fixes everything, but I think the Catholics now acknowledge it doesn't. But acknowledging and changing reactions to those "errors" are completely different things.
     
  19. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Historically they spent vast sums on architecture that was designed to create awe and challenge disbelief. Not sure if that is still the aim.

    Of course we now value all that architecture highly as part of national heritage and don't question what they might have done otherwise.
     
  20. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Example of "Christianity" at work.
    One Bank Holiday weekend the Keralan community that attend the local RC Church arranged with one of the priests to do the Mass in their native tongue and afterwards to have a "Curry NIght" where they would provide food for everyone who turned up regardless of whether or not they were Churchgoers or whatever.
    Everyone who attended church knew this was happening and yet they turned up and complained about the Mass being in a different language.
    I was there (yes for the free food, but Mrs S goes to that church) overheard someone complaining, and I just happened to mention that we should love our neighbour as our-self oh and didn't the disciples start speaking in tongues on one occasion.....collapse of stout party
     

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