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Transferring of large files (mainly video)

Discussion in 'Beginner's Corner' started by Maroon, Apr 19, 2018.

  1. Maroon

    Maroon Well-Known Member

    Hello all,

    I'm looking to find a way to transfer video files both to editors (raw files) as well as to customer without having to physically hand over hard drives.

    Does anyone know of any solution that can be used that could either compress my files (without loss of quality) to make them easier to send or any other solution that could help?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    The easiest way these days is to put it on cloud storage and provide the other party with a link. The older solution is by FTP but this involves one or other of you hosting an FTP server.
     
  3. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    It all depends on the original file structures and sizes. Most video is already compressed and further compression may actually make the file bigger! There are some suggestions here.
     
  4. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    How big are these files? And what format is the raw video in (and the customer file)?
     
  5. Maroon

    Maroon Well-Known Member

    @Andrew Flannigan @PeteRob I had first looked at cloud storage but the limits are much too low!

    Roughly 100gb (wedding shoots) mostly shot and final edit given in .mov/.avi formats.
     
  6. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    You're in the realm of specialist file transfer services. You're already outside of the max size most free cloud services offer, and you're beyond the size most people could comfortably download in a 'reasonable' amount of time. None of the specialist services are free but they may be cheaper than buying a lot of hard drives.

    https://www.signiant.com/
    https://www.dropbox.com/lp/business/transfer-files
     
  7. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    In that case why not consider USB sticks? SanDisk currently do a 128GB USB 2.0 for £24.89 at Amazon.
     
  8. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Gosh. Go for the hard drives/pen drives then. There was an old American saying in the days when mass storage was on tape and FTP was the only way to move stuff over very slow lines - "never underestimate the bandwidth of a station-wagon". You'll probably recoup the cost in the manhours saved messing about.
     
  9. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    Try WeTransfer.com
     
  10. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    "A better service
    • Send up to 20GB at a time"
    So still not big enough!
     
  11. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    100 GB is a huge amount to send over a public network. It doesn't strike me as a realistic proposition.
     
  12. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    It's doable, you need to use a specialised service.
     
  13. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    and you'd need a very good link - the degree of redundancy needed for error correction must be quite high. The specialist service would have to include more than just 100 GB of temporary storage.
     
  14. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    Yes, it would take about 3 hours for me at home to download a file that size (on ADSL). More of an issue is uploading it (unless someone's got something other than ADSL, upload speeds are often significantly lower than download speeds). It would take about 5 times as long for me to get a 100GB file to the service in the first place. The storage side is a non-issue these days, disk is cheap for service providers. Error correction is built into the network layer, and has always been so other than slowing down the overall rate it's not really a problem and these days, error rates even on Internet connections are low.

    These are issues that media companies resolve all the time when sharing very, very large files (100GB is probably average). The bigger issue is business to customer, where you don't have control over the customer's connection.
     
  15. Maroon

    Maroon Well-Known Member


    Thanks for that, signiant.com looks very interesting. From what I'm reading they are able to reduce transfer speeds by up to 200x which is fantastic, obviously though as always, it comes with a cost.

    In my search, I have come across the site https://www.justbeamit.com/. I've managed to transfer an 80gb file, although it does require both computers to be on for the entire transfer and is extremely slow (which makes signiant/com look very appealing).

    @Andrew Flannigan @PeteRob The issue is we sometimes have clients who require a specific style (Indian/Bollywood) for the edit and the company that usually provides it for us has moved the majority of their operations to India!
     
  16. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    As Tony said the limiting thing is your upload speed. If tbe file is 100 GB and is compressed then you can estimate the transfer time. There is nothing that Signiant can do to break that bottleneck but it may have a robust method for transfers that is fault tolerant and can avoid restarts.

    We have 2 Mb/s on a good day*so 100 x1024 x 8 / 2 = 409600 s. for the data alone which is about 114 hours then there is some overhead for the transfer because it goes in packets. I don't know what this is, say 30%, so for me it would be about 148 hours assuming nothing went wrong. That is why I was surprised you even think of doing it. I guess if you have fibre to your desk and a premium low contention service the numbers might be better.

    * I just measured it. 15.93 down and 2.1 up.
     
  17. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    I used to work on around 5-10% overhead when doing the maths for this stuff was a daily occurrence. However, it does depend on the kind of connection you have and how much encapsulation is going on.
     
  18. Maroon

    Maroon Well-Known Member

    We managed to do the 80gb overnight (although I just checked we have 16.1 upload on a business line).

    So I had thought it may be possible there was a faster solution than this, but from what you're saying it seems nearly impossible that there is.

    Thank you, everyone, for the input!
     
  19. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    128GB USB keys in the post.

    Or you need something better than ADSL (for which upload speeds are always limited).
     

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