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Three Short Pieces

Discussion in 'Talking Pictures' started by Roger Hicks, Jun 24, 2017.

  1. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Fishboy and steveandthedogs like this.
  2. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Some very good stuff there. One thing that works for me is that the smaller the camera the less I get noticed. I also find that a waist level finder seems to make me less noticeable. Other people may well find otherwise.
     
  3. Fishboy

    Fishboy Well-Known Member

    Nice work Mr Hicks. You make some interesting points - particularly on the subject of 'chimping' in street photography. I only really look at the picture on the screen of the camera when I'm doing landscapes or still life nowadays - I've managed to almost completely stop looking when I'm out on the streets.

    Cheers, Jeff
     
  4. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Andrew,

    Thank'ee kindly. Certainly agree about smaller cameras, though it's not just smaller: it's "less gadgety, less beset with knobs and dials, and without half an acre of front lens element".

    As for waist level, well, as you say, it's deeply personal. Frances laughed and said, "For a woman with a big bust, the effect may be to make it MORE conspicuous." But not as conspicuous as wearing an immaculate black Nikon F: "There was a time when they looked at my breasts. Now it's my black Nikon F."

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  5. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Jeff,

    Thanks. Yes, I think chimping is a disaster in street photography.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  6. Plutus

    Plutus Well-Known Member

    I like them.
    As someone who has never done Street I thinkI will have a go.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  7. Digitalmemories

    Digitalmemories Well-Known Member

    Thought provoking articles, I particularly like the point about looking for the composition, rather than looking at the people.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.

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