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Supermarket bread pricing.....

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by dangie, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. dangie

    dangie Senior Knobhead

    An 800g uncut white bread loaf in my local branch of a large supermarket chain costs 0.70p

    An 400g uncut white bread loaf in the same branch costs 0.75p

    Struggle to get my head around it...... :confused:
     
  2. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    Do you know how much it costs to glue all those slices back together? :eek:

    ;)
     
    dream_police and Fishboy like this.
  3. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    I buy uncut wholemeal bread from Morrisons, when I can, a standard loaf is anywhere between£1.00 and £1.40 this past year, with a small loaf mostly 70p. My problem with Morrisons is though the bread is excellent when they get it right, they cut all the best loaves and leave all the misshapen, unevenly risen and positively flat one as Uncut loaves. So many weeks (including this week) I buy from Tescos which is always risen, but sometime dry on the day it is made. (ok this week)
     
  4. DaveS

    DaveS Well-Known Member

    I don't see why they have to slice every loaf in sight. Surly they have a slicing machine, so if you want it sliced buy it unsliced and get it done there. Afterall you can always cut an unsliced loaf, but can't uncut one that's already cut.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  5. LesleySM

    LesleySM Well-Known Member

    Recently one of my local supermarkets had a "special" 4 tins of Heinz baked beans for £1.50 but when and alongside it not on special offer were single tins of the same for 30p each!
     
  6. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    In the case of Morrison's, probably because there's no one working on bakery or anyone suitably trained with the necessary food hygiene qualifications to slice the loaf after the early shift has finished. My wife works there and they're slashing hours and not recruiting staff. To say the staff are fed up is an understatement.
     
  7. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    Probably the same for most businesses, unfortunately.
     
  8. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Hard to earn a crust in retail at the moment....
     
    steveandthedogs likes this.
  9. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Hmmm - not much bread in baking.
     
  10. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Knead I say more?
     
  11. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Well, you can buy good bread, or you can buy cheap bread. Here in France the default price is unsliced, or you pay (normally) 10 centimes extra to put it through the slicer.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  12. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    On a rare visit to Aldi late last year I spotted a 1.5l bottle of Argentinian Malbec for (IIRC) £13.50. Ooooh, I thought, tempting. Then I saw the next item on the shelf. Same Malbec, 750ml, £6.50. :confused:
     
    Geren likes this.
  13. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    You would be better getting your teeth around it...
     
  14. daft_biker

    daft_biker Action Man!

    I gather the risk of not following food safety is a £20,000 fine and a couple of years in jail, potentially, although I suspect that would be for a rather more serious offence than cutting a loaf of bread without wearing an apron, hat and washing hands with soap. Training staff is possibly a more likely outcome.

    Put bread in, close guard, wait, grab and slide......the only bit that takes practice is sliding the slices into the bag without any falling over. Don't even have to pull a lever to get the bread through the machine these days.

    Easiest job in the shop?
     
  15. dangie

    dangie Senior Knobhead

    Just to clarify my original post, the two loaves were identical bread, both uncut. One was 800g the other 400g
    800g cost 0.70p the smaller 400g cost 0.75p

    This was not a one-off. It's how they [Morrisons] price them all the time.
     
  16. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    It is so that the poor single person pays more for their bread.
     
  17. Dorset_Mike

    Dorset_Mike Grumpy Old Fart

    Tesco, Jaffa cake bars pack of 4 £1.40, pack of 10 "Special offer" £1.20 this "offer" sems to repeat frequently, such that if ytou buy 2 or 3 ten packs at the offer price by the time they have ben eaten the offer is back on.

    As for bread I haven't bought a loaf for years, living alone it would take too long to get through a loaf before it goes beyond edibilty, and I do not haqve enough space in my fridge/freezer to freeze it as well as freeze & store enough frozen meat fruit and veg; In the summer months I go to a "pick your own" farm and get fruit and veg to freeze, for meat I try to buy the larger packs of chops, mince and steaks etc and freeze those, hence no space for bread. I occasionally buy one of the small packs of "thins" that have appeared recently if I fancy a couple of sandwiches, but they are not really an economical way of buying bread

    (fully qualified pensioner)
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018
  18. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    I think it's more mundane than that. The unit cost of production of a loaf has little to do with the ingredients. With such relatively small amounts it's all about labour and power use. It might well be that the smaller loaf is more expensive or exactly the same price to produce. If that's the case what should the retailer do?
     
  19. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    At our local Morrisons Ordinary store baked white and wholemeal loaves are usually £1 for 800g and 70p for 400g. Usually there is an offer of 2 x 400g for £1. Sometimes sliced bread is on the shelves but usually only unsliced. Staff will slice it on being asked at no charge. The machine seems to have at least 2 thickness settings. The bags used are suitable for home freezing.
     
  20. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    They are happy enough to expect farmers to sell at a loss, perhaps they should try it too?
     
    Andrew Flannigan likes this.

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