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Something of a revelation

Discussion in 'Talking Pictures' started by Andrew Flannigan, Nov 2, 2017.

  1. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    A friend mentioned that The Photographic Angle were putting on an exhibition of wildlife photography at Clyst House which is part of a disused office complex on the western side of Exeter. Actually finding it is an interesting excercise as you have to go to the village of Clyst St Mary then find Church Lane (which leads to the parish church) and then go right to the end of the road where you'll find the church and parking space. Walk back the way you came and on the right there's an opening which has posters for the exhibition and several warning signs about police dog training on the site.

    The exhibition is spread all over quite a large building and consists of poster sized canvass prints interspersed with "wise" sayings from photographers. The latter are good for a laugh. The pictures are well chosen and worth seeing but there are a lot of them spread over 3 floors so you need plenty of time to go round. I quite enjoyed myself but one thing really impressed me. Several of the pictures were made on small sensor cameras including at least one on a Canon Ixus. Without looking at the information panels I couldn't tell which shots were made on full frame and which came off a 1/2.3" sensor. So much for the equipment snobs!

    The exhibition is on until 3pm on November 5th so not too much time to get there. More details here: http://www.thephotographicangle.co.uk/exhibitions/

    Sony HX90 8GB 01 DSC01107.JPG
     
    Geren, peterba and steveandthedogs like this.
  2. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Thanks Andrew - I might have reason to be in the Exeter area, so it's just possible that I could get there - although, as you say, there's limited time before it closes.
     
  3. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Quite!
     
  4. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    It certainly would be an interesting exercise, if you go looking for it on the Western side of Exeter...! ;)
     
    Andrew Flannigan likes this.
  5. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Aaaarrrggg! Eastern. Eastern. EASTERN!!!! :(
     
    peterba likes this.
  6. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    I have pictures from a 7Mp Canon PowerShot A710 IS printed to A3. The sensor is a 1/2.5" CCD. The pictures capable of being printed to that size were all taken in ideal conditions. There was adequate light and the contrast fit within the rather limited dynamic range of the sensor. I prefer my modern DX cameras for better reasons than snobbery.
     
  7. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Care to share those reasons?
     
  8. PentaxManiac

    PentaxManiac Well-Known Member

    Well, It's convenient to have the film speed set for you automatically. But always best to have an override facility, or provision for setting the speed of a film without DX coding (like the Lomography 200 ISO slide film) rather than having it default to 100 ISO as is often the case.
     
  9. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Compared to the Canon A710 IS.
    An ability to take photographs in low light conditions.
    An abiliy to take photographs of high contrast subjects and to produce a printable images by fiddling with the sliders in lightroom, or curves.
    The ability to use a variety of lenses from 10-20 to 200-500mm.(or even a bigger range if I spent the cash).
    An ability to blast away at high frame rates in order to get a shot which I could not do so with a camera that took an indeterminate time to take a shot after pressing the release.
    A viewfinder that shows what I am about to shoot.
    An exceedingly good AF system.
    I do not need ideal conditions to make pictures.

    The A710 IS does have the advantage of portability over a brace of D500 with lenses. A more sensible comparison would be to my Sony RX100M3.
    The Sony has many of the advantages of the DX cameras except for the interchangeable lenses and AF system. The sensor is not quite as sensitive as DX either. It was also a slippery (supply your own expletive) until I bought the optional grip that should have come as standard.

    The A710 IS still has a couple of advantages. It works with a pair of eneloop AA cells (which still had not been invented when the camera was made) and the clock battery (a CR1220) can be replaced every few years without having to dismantle the camera and apply a soldering iron.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2017
  10. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Nice one:)
    I remember DX coded films. It was a good idea, and it worked. I guess that it still does.
     
  11. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    So you're comparing to an 11 year old camera? Why not compare to a current camera? Something like the Nikon P900 can match your criteria close enough for all but the most extreme cases as Jack and others have shown with their pictures.
     
  12. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Andrew, my original post was to support your statement that small sensor cameras can make decent photographs and have been capable of doing so for some time. I stated my preference for modern DX as an asside.
    The Nikon P900 does indeed do better than I would expect but it still lacks the image quality or AF performance that I like.
    My present kit is better than I require. A decent bridge like the Sony RX10m3 came close. I use a Sony RX100m3 as a pocket camera and the quality is fine for almost everything that I do; I have no inclination to upgrade it to a mark 5. I suspect that a Sony RX10m4 would suit me fine for serious photography but I am not going to downgrade. I enjoy using nice things.
     

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