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Scanner required for 35mm slides and negatives

Discussion in 'Digital Image Editing & Printing' started by Ray Proudfoot, Sep 4, 2017.

  1. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    There are directions for it. It is actually quite easy to use, many of the options are set-up, such as film type and intended print size, you just run through and adjust them to your needs. Many don't need to be reset once you have done this. The actual scan can be adjusted before being made after the low-res pre-scan has been seen. It is quite intuitive in reality. Final adjustments can be made post-scan in an image editing programme as per output from your digital camera. Scanned pictures from film have a rather different look to those that are digitally originated. As I think I have already mentioned I find they need a greater amount of sharpening applied than images from a digital camera.
     
  2. Ray Proudfoot

    Ray Proudfoot Well-Known Member

    How did you get NikonScan to work with W10?
     
  3. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

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  4. Ray Proudfoot

    Ray Proudfoot Well-Known Member

    Impressive Terry. How long did it take you to get up to that standard?

    I've asked a few questions to two sellers in the UK. The nearest to me has replied saying he bought it 2 years ago from someone who bought it new. So only two owners and it's in mint condition according to the ad.

    I spoke to a lady at Fixation who confirmed they are able to service them and can replace motors should it be necessary. That's my main reason for even considering Nikon. An outlet that can repair them if necessary. Hopefully it won't be.

    Waiting to hear back from another seller who has shown NikonScan working with W10. I would at least like to try NikonScan before trying alternatives.
     
  5. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    I tried using the Nikon software when I was running XP, I found it a nightmare and literally abandoned trying to use the scanner. When I had more time on my hands I decided to try getting the scanner running, by which time I had W7, also not easily compatible with the Nikon software. I looked into both Silverfast and Vuescan. I opted for the latter on the grounds of ease of use and cost.

    A friend bought a Coolscan 8000 a couple of years ago and added Vuescan to operate it, he already owned a Minolta 5400 35mm scanner, he found Vuescan worked far better with that than the original software. My advice fwiw is to forget the Nikon software and go for Vuescan. Vuescan is well supported by Ed Hamrick and there are readily downloaded updates from time to time.
     
  6. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    Those were the first scans I have made with the Minolta for more than two years. It is not a difficult process. Mind you I had to do a bit of spot removal in photoshop for the black and white as the negs was a bit scratched and dirty.
     
  7. Ray Proudfoot

    Ray Proudfoot Well-Known Member

    I've spent some time reading reviews and comments about VueScan versus SilverFast. You'd never buy anything if you placed trust in those because most people only post when something is wrong / not working. But the general consensus of each is that VueScan will support all scanners with one purchase but the interface is spartan and not particularly user-friendly. There's little on-line help. Silverfast is expensive, only works with the hardware it is registered with, still a poor interface and still no decent online help. Neither is ideal but it's all we've got.
     
  8. Ray Proudfoot

    Ray Proudfoot Well-Known Member

    But years of experience probably helped when you went back to it. I've read quite a few comments online and most have the same complaints. The interface is rudimentary and not very user-friendly. When you consider the polished interface of PE for example scanning software seems a million miles away. Anyway, you haven't lost your touch. Nice work.
     
  9. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    As I mentioned before the interface is not rudimentary though if you chose the beginner option it can be. though it changes what it shows as to the scanner you are using with it. If the scanner has few inbuilt options then they are the only ones you will get to adjust. for example Others let you do multiple scans of the same image. for better results. most allow you to select the maker and type of film emulsions you are scanning.

    Most software has a learning curve and Vuescan is easier than most. there are plenty of people on the web who would find noughts and Crosses to difficult for them.

    Compared to Photoshop Vuescan is basic.
     
  10. Ray Proudfoot

    Ray Proudfoot Well-Known Member

    Thanks Terry. I tend to agree with you that there is a learning curve to all but the simplest of things.

    Anyway, I've been in touch with two sellers in the NW and I'm going to see one tomorrow. The seller is a pro photographer who has no further need having scanned his film stock. I've downloaded the demo version of VueScan to my laptop and we'll plug the Nikon in to it tomorrow and demo it on a couple of Kodachromes and colour negs.

    One question. I've just looked at some of my slides and they're in GePe holders. I can't see what film I used. How much of a problem could that be? Photos taken in early 80s.
     
  11. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Amateur doesn't mean beginner or lacking in skill or dedication. I don't use Photoshop because I don't retouch beyond basics possible in Lightroom. The basic manipulation of a raw image is the same in Photoshop and Lightroom. Lightroom has a built in organiser and other tools that make it a useful starting point and Adobe license Photoshop and Lightroom together because their synergy is helpful. There is a stand-alone Lightroom package but you have to be dedicated to find it on Adobe's site.
     
  12. Ray Proudfoot

    Ray Proudfoot Well-Known Member

    I never suggested it did Pete. But given the cost of Photoshop I would have expected PE or Lightroom would be more popular.

    Anyway, the chap who I'm going to see tomorrow used ColorPerfect in combination with Photoshop. I checked VueScan and it too has a ColorPerfect plugin. Have any of you tried that combo?
     
  13. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    It shouldn't be a problem really. Firstly GePe mounts can be opened so you can then see what the film stock is, it will be marked at regular intervals at the edges, Where transparency film is concerned you can just set Vuescan to "generic" anyway, the only issue might be if they happen to be Kodachrome, which you could identify by the emulsion side if nothing else, as it looks unlike other films. There was also a Gratispool slide film that was similar to Kodachrome and needs to be scanned in the same way, but it is fairly unlikely you will have this.
     
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  14. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    Not really necessary with Vuescan as it already has all the preset profiles for every make of colour neg/ pos film, going back years.

    The shot I scanned in my previous post above was a Kodak film, but I processed it using the Fuji preset, as it looked better when I checked it out. Over time colours fade and the "correct" preset is not always the "best" result.
     
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  15. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Elements or photoshop is the choice for retouching, I believe they both use Adobe Camera Raw for raw conversion. Lightroom is a raw processor and organiser. You export files for retouching in another package if you need it. It happens that Lightroom comes "free" if you licence Photoshop (you can't buy Photoshop any more - it is an annual fee). How long Lightroom alone be available for purchase I don't know. There is at least one difference between the stand-alone and licensed versions but so far Adobe have offered upgrade pricing for major upgrades that is competitive with the licenced version cost.
     
  16. Ray Proudfoot

    Ray Proudfoot Well-Known Member

    Thanks. I wonder why they bothered to include it then.

    Hopefully that won't make the task of finding a suitable preset too laborious.
     
  17. Ray Proudfoot

    Ray Proudfoot Well-Known Member

    Yes, PE14 has the ability to open a RAW file and manipulate the image. I don't think it includes dust removal though. Presumably that's best done during the actual scan.

    I hate these packages that you 'rent'. Yes, you may get new features but how many of them are genuinely useful.
     
  18. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Auto-dust removal is a scanner option. I think it does a prescan using IR that just marks the dust particles then magically removes them. Doing them one by one in post processing is an option but a time costly one
     
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  19. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    No it only takes a click. If you don't like what you see, you can click back again, on my computer the change is virtually instant.

    As for why colour perfect is sold, to make money.?
     
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  20. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    Glass type GePe holders can be a problem. If they are, you will have to take them out, which would be a fag. It is a suck it and see problem. I have never had a problem with glassless mounts.
     

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