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Poll - Do you provide supplementary food for wildlife during winter to photograph them more easily?

Discussion in 'Weekly Poll' started by Chrissie_Lay, Jan 19, 2017.

  1. Chrissie_Lay

    Chrissie_Lay AP Editor's PA

    Do you provide supplementary food for wildlife during winter to photograph them more easily? Cast your vote

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  2. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    No. I feed them because they need it. It is more interesting to photograph birds away from feeders.
     
    Wheelu likes this.
  3. Roger_Provins

    Roger_Provins Well-Known Member

    We feed seed and peanuts all the year not just winter.
    From RSPB ...
     
    Zou likes this.
  4. AlanW

    AlanW Well-Known Member

    Same here, feed them all year . . . . no photographs, they're mostly LBJ's :)
     
  5. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    No. We feed them all year around for their general well being. Like Pete I prefer not photograph at feeders but accept there is sometimes no option.
     
    Zou likes this.
  6. retrofit

    retrofit Well-Known Member

    I have feeders and bird bath out all year, I'm not really a fan of nature photography...
     
  7. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    As most of above, the food is there for their benefit, not photographic purposes. I've no gripes with feeder shots but it isn't the reason for feeding the birds.
     
  8. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    An excessively "green" friend reckoned we should NEVER feed them, as it interferes with the balance of nature. My view is that we ARE a part of the balance of nature. So, like others, I feed them but don't normally photograph them.

    As the Buddha phrased it, "All sentient beings desire happiness and the causes of happiness, and to avoid suffering and the causes of suffering."

    Which makes you wonder if readers of "literary" fiction, and indeed Brexiteers, are sentient beings...

    Cheers,

    R.
     
    Wheelu and steveandthedogs like this.
  9. Fishboy

    Fishboy Well-Known Member

    I don't have a garden so I don't put anything out and it's very rare that I photograph wildlife anyway. If I were to put out food, say on a nearby wall, I'm pretty sure it'd be snatched by the packs of feral children that roam the streets of Rochdale.

    Cheers, Jeff
     
  10. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    You said it.
     
  11. Wheelu

    Wheelu Well-Known Member

    We also feed them when we are at home, but in particular in the winter time. There is a pair of blackbirds nesting in the garden and they seem to like pieces of apple core etc. I don't normally photograph the birds in the garden, but we recently had a heron come to call. It stood next to a metallic heron sculpture by the pond, and I managed a few shots before it flew off. Magical!
     
  12. Maroon

    Maroon Active Member

    You could also say that we have destroyed many of their food sources by building over their habitat and so are just replacing (albeit a tiny amount) what they would have had anyway!
     
  13. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Very true, except that in the wild they wouldn't get bread, chopped cheese rinds, ham scraps... I think that's what my chum John was complaining about. Your point is however pretty much the same as mine: we are a part of the balance of nature.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  14. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    I agree with what appears to be the consensus here. I actually enjoy nature photography, but not so much bird feeder photography; the food is for their benefit, not mine.
     
  15. cliveva

    cliveva Well-Known Member

    seed for the finches & tits, fat balls for cold weather energy,(winter only), many berry bearing trees and shrubs, as well as an apple for the blackbirds ! I really could do with a big lens to get the shots I would really like, lots of perching places .....need 600mm , um:rolleyes:
     

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