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PC help - desktop won't start!

Discussion in 'Computer Related Help & Discussion' started by Paul_R, Jun 6, 2007.

  1. Paul_R

    Paul_R Well-Known Member

    Re: Is it fixed now?

    Over my head that one, Fen, I'm affraid. :D
     
  2. Paul_R

    Paul_R Well-Known Member

    Well, early diagnosis is a hard drive failure! Not sure how old the drive is but I have just found some paperwork (an old email) where I was discussing with the PC Doctor what size drive to have fitted. The email was dated March 2006 so in the worst case scenario the drive is a maximum of 15 months old. Pretty poor going I would have thought although I’m no expert! Not sure what make it was but I’ll find out. Funnily enough I had just bought a new external 500GB drive and then my internal drive gives up the ghost! Any way, I suppose it gives me an excuse to fit a bigger internal drive!
     
  3. Lounge Lizard

    Lounge Lizard Well-Known Member

    It does no harm to unplug the IDE connector to the drive at each end and plug them in again. Making a better connection seems to wonderfully revive some 'dead' hard discs.
     
  4. Gordon_McGeachie

    Gordon_McGeachie In the Stop Bath

    Generally they say that as to which size hard drive you need, you work out what size you need now and double it. With the prices of hard drives just now why not go BIG. This way you could partition the drive and do a multi boot system I.E use the `c` drive to install windows 98 for programmes that wont/dont work for XP, and then the `d` drive for windows XP. if you choose to go this way, install windows 98 (C drive)first with all drivers etc, then start to install XP normally,but, you MUST choose the `fresh installation` option which will then ask you where you want it to go (D drive). when you restart the pc you will be given a menu in which you can choose which version you want.
     
  5. Paul_R

    Paul_R Well-Known Member

    I think the drive has already been removed from my pc and plugged into another one so it does look as though its knackered.

    As for size, that's exactly what I'm thinking about now. I have been looking on ebuyer.com and I can get a Seagate 320GB for about £50 or a 500GB for about £75, as long as my PC can cope with a 500GB? I take it I need to be looking for an IDE drive, ideally 7,200 spin and the more cache the better? Looking on ebuyer it seems the norm for cache is anywhere between 8 and 16 meg. Anything else I should look for?

    I have never used a partitioned drive before but I suppose I could use one partition for OS programmes and another for downloading stuff off the web and another section for storing images etc. I'm thinking if I use a certain partition for downloading stuff off the web would help keep the PC from being slown down with all the cr*p?

    P.S. The knackered drive is still under warranty until Feb 2009 but I'm not sure I want to wait for the 'new' drive to be delivered and if its 'like for like' I'm not sure if I want to have the same type of drive anyway. There is also the fact that I will be returning my drive without being able to wipe it clean first. I will probably buy a new drive, fit it and maybe send the old one back for a replacement later and then maybe put it on ebay or somewhere.
     
  6. Fen

    Fen Well-Known Member

    Re: Is it fixed now?

    Not to worry... Was commenting that the previous comment made me laugh so much that I nearly spat my drink over my keyboard :D
     
  7. Paul_R

    Paul_R Well-Known Member

    Re: Is it fixed now?

    Ahh...I see. Sorry, I can be a little 'slow' at times
     
  8. Gordon_McGeachie

    Gordon_McGeachie In the Stop Bath

    it all depends on the age of your pc, you may have the option of SATA drives which are quicker and normally work in pairs.

    7,200 is the normal spin speed and that with a large cache would suffice for most users. As I said in an earlier reply, work out what you need now and double it for future use. It may also be worth thinking about an external drive for backups. As you say about partitioning, use one for your O/S and the other for storage and backups. If your drive is under warranty until 2009 then I suggest that you contact them and explain it died and you should find that they will replace it with a new one when you send it back, depending on how it died, you may be able to format it first before returning
     
  9. RichardReeves

    RichardReeves Well-Known Member

    An older motherboard might only see something like the first 137GB, as my brother discovered when he put a 250GB drive in his old PC :)
    As far as HDDs from Ebuyer, be careful of their OEM drives, as unless they've changed it recently, they package them with little protection.



    Richard
     
  10. Paul_R

    Paul_R Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the info, Gordon.
     
  11. Paul_R

    Paul_R Well-Known Member

    The drive that was in the PC was a 160GB so hoepefully I won't have any probs!
     
  12. Gordon_McGeachie

    Gordon_McGeachie In the Stop Bath

    every hadr drive I get from them comes in a cardboard box packed with polystyrene foam and they all arrive safely
     
  13. Paul_R

    Paul_R Well-Known Member

    Seagate 500GB ordered tonight from ebuyer.com.

    However, I have just noticed on the item description that it states the connector is a 40 Pin IDC connector. Does that mean its not an IDE drive? It is listed under 'IDE' drives.

    Item can be seen here

    Scroll right down!
     
  14. Meredith

    Meredith Well-Known Member

    That'll be a typo then. No such connector as IDC. It has a IDE connector.
     
  15. Paul_R

    Paul_R Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the quick response. Puts my mind at rest :)
     
  16. RichardReeves

    RichardReeves Well-Known Member

    IDE is the interface standard (just like USB and SATA are.) The actual connectors are called IDC (Insulation Displacement Connector) connectors. IDCs are the usual choice for ribbon-cable assemblies. The name comes from the way the ribbon cable is pushed into the contacts. The contacts look like a pair of knives - the blades slice through the insulation and make contact with the exposed conductor.



    Richard
     
  17. Paul_R

    Paul_R Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the explanation, Richard. To be honest, I'm not bothered what they are called as long as I have ordered the right one! :D
     
  18. Gordon_McGeachie

    Gordon_McGeachie In the Stop Bath

    I`m glad that everything is getting sorted out for you.

    Are you going to go the dual boot (98/XP) way or just the one O/S?
     
  19. Paul_R

    Paul_R Well-Known Member

    Thanks, Gordon. As for the dual boot option, I'm not sure. I have had a little search on the web trying to gather more information as to what the benefits are etc as I have very limited knowledge on this. I'll probably also seek advice from the PC Doctor who is currently nursing my poorly PC ;)
     
  20. Gordon_McGeachie

    Gordon_McGeachie In the Stop Bath

    The major benefit of `dual booting` is that if you have any programmes (mainly games for the kids)that work on 98 and not xp then you can still use them.

    You can still use the net to get any updates that the games need, and also, if you use FAT32 for the 98 drive and NTSF for the xp drive, the xp drive can not be viewed from the 98 drive, so as long as your xp drive is password protected any info there should be safe from prying eyes in the house, and also the risk of files being deleted is reduced.
     

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